Courses

Overview

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MSc | IPN students in Psychology Labs | MSc to PhD transfer | PhD

All students in the IPN Program must complete NEUR-705, Responsible Conduct of Research (0 credits) to graduate.

IPN MSc Neuroscience

You must have accumulated a minimum of 45 credits to obtain your MSc degree:

IPN MSc Students
  • 9 credits resulting from 3 in-class courses
    • 1 required course chosen from: PNI (NEUR 630) and PNII (NEUR 631)
    • 2 elective courses (may include the other PN.)

IPN-Psychology MSc Students

  • 9 credits resulting from 3 in-class courses:
    • 1 course chosen from: PNI (NEUR 630) or PNII (NEUR 631)
    • PSYC 650
    • PSYC 661
 
  • Obligatory: All students admitted to IPN in September 2010 and after must complete NEUR 705, Responsible Conduct of Research (0 credits), to graduate.
  • 36 credits resulting from “research courses” which correspond to different milestones in your degree and are NOT in-class courses. You do not need to complete a given milestone (ex: thesis seminar) in the same semester for which you registered for the corresponding research course (ex: NEUR 698 Master’s Seminar Presentation.)(See below.)

MSc Required Credits (36) (register for courses as shown below.)

1st Semester
NEUR 697 – Master’s Project Proposal – 9 credits

2nd Semester
NEUR 698 – Master’s Seminar Presentation – 9 credits

3rd Semester
NEUR 699 – Master’s Thesis Submission – 12 credits
NEUR 696 – Master’s Thesis Research 2 – 6 credits
 

Transfer from MSc to PhD

You must register for NEUR 700 in the semester you plan on transferring.
YOU MUST ALSO APPLY to the PhD program by contacting ipn.admissions [at] mcgill.ca

IPN PhD Neuroscience

There is no minimum number of credits required for PhDs to complete degree in IPN, however PhD students must complete:

  • 2 required courses: PNI (NEUR 630) and PNII (NEUR 631)
  • 2 elective courses
  • Obligatory: All students admitted to IPN in September 2010 and after must complete NEUR 705, Responsible Conduct of Research (0 credits), to graduate.
  • NB. PhDs need not register for research courses
  • PhDs must register for Candidacy Exam (NEUR 700) in the semester they complete this milestone.

Course Lists

 

IPN CORE AND MANDATORY COURSES

NEUR 630 (Principles of Neuroscience 1) *CORE

NEUR 630

3 credits
Principles of Neuroscience 1.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: An overview of cellular and molecular neuroscience at the graduate level. Topics include: synthesis, processing and intracellular transport of macromolecules; development of the nervous system including neurogenesis, axonal pathfinding, synaptogenesis and myelination; neuronal survival and response to injury; generation and propagation of action potentials; neurotransmitters and synaptic transmission.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Fall
  • Prerequisites: BIOL 200 and BIOL 201 or equivalent; permission of instructor
  • Terms
    • Fall 2017
  • Instructors
    • Alyson Elise Fournier, Peter Scott McPherson, Reza Sharif Naeini


For course web site click here

NEUR 705 (RCR) *MANDATORY

More information on NEUR705 can be found in the tab for the course at the top of the page. Note that this course is mandatory for all IPN students.

NEUR 705

0 credit
Responsible Research Conduct.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: Introduction to the ethics of scientific research and publication and to the distinctions between appropriate scientific conduct and scientific misconduct.

Offered by: Neuroscience, Integrated Pgm

  • Restriction: Restricted to graduate students in the Integrated Program in Neuroscience
  • Terms
    • Fall 2017
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Emily Bell, Joseph Rochford

NEUR 631 (Principles of Neuroscience 2) *CORE

NEUR 631

3 credits
Principles of Neuroscience 2.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: An overview of the structure, function and interaction of neuronal systems of vertebrates. Topics include basic neuroanatomy, coding and processing of sensory information (somatic sensory, visual and auditory systems), control of posture and voluntary movement, learning and memory, processing of language and speech, cerebral blood flow, the neuroendocrine system and neuroimmunology.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Winter
  • Prerequisite: A knowledge of basic mechanisms of biology, physiology, and anatomy as covered by respective undergraduate classes is expected and necessary to succeed in this course.
  • Restriction: Students must be enrolled in a graduate program at McGill University. Students from other universities, as well as undergraduate students from McGill require special permission from the Instructor.
  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • David S Ragsdale, Carl P Ernst, Joseph Rochford

 

Non-core course electives may be selected from the lists below. Note: If you wish to take a graduate-level course not on this list, your supervisor must email us at ipn [at] mcgill.ca with his or her approval and a brief note describing why the student should take the course.  This email from the supervisor is required in order to ensure the course is applied to your degree.

IPN GRADUATE COURSES (ELECTIVE)

NEUR 603 (Computational Neuroscience)

NEUR 603

3 credits
Computational Neuroscience.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: A survey of computational methods commonly used to model brain function, including mathematical modeling to describe the relationship between neuronal activity and perception, action, and cognition. Mathematical basis for vision, motor control and attention. Data relevant to brain processes and models explaining these data, using engineering, statistics and artificial intelligence.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Winter
  • Basic neuroanatomy/neurophysiology, some mathematics (calculus, probability/statistics) or consent of instructor.
  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Christopher C Pack

NEUR 605 (Neuroscience Seminar 4)

2015 Syllabus

NEUR 605

3 credits
Neuroscience Seminar 4.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: This course focuses on neuronal development and maturation from a molecular aspect. We introduce various model organisms and systems that are used to study molecular aspects of development, explore their particular advantages and explore the cellular and molecular events that contribute to the development of the nervous system.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Winter
  • Offered alternate years - odd numbered years
  • Symbols:
  • Taught only in alternate years
  • Terms
    • This course is not scheduled for the 2017 academic year
  • Instructors
    • There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017 academic year

NEUR 610

This new course will be avilable in Winter 2015, and will no longer be a core course. Details will be added here when finalised.
Instructor: Dr. David Ragsdale

NEUR 550 (Free Radical Biomedicine)

NEUR 550

3 credits
Free Radical Biomedicine.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: An interdisciplinary course on the biochemistry and cellular/molecular biology of free radicals, transition metals, oxidative stress and antioxidants and their roles in health and disease.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Symbols:
  • Taught only in alternate years
  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Hyman M Schipper, Konstantinos Pantopoulos

NEUR 570 (Human Brain Imaging)

NEUR 570

3 credits
Human Brain Imaging.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: Current methods that are used to investigate human brain structure and function will be discussed with an emphasis on Magnetic Resonance-based techniques including functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
  • Restriction: Students must be enrolled in the Integrated Program in Neuroscience (IPN) graduate program at McGill University. McGill students enrolled in other graduate programs as well as undergraduate students and students from other universities are encouraged to apply and should contact the course instructors.
  • Contact hours: by appointment - please contact any of the responsible instructors by email
  • Terms
    • This course is not scheduled for the 2017 academic year
  • Instructors
    • There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017 academic year

NEUR 602 (Current Topics in Neuroscience)

NEUR 602

3 credits
Current Topics in Neuroscience.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: Current topics in Neuroscience.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Fall
  • Prerequisite: Permission of unit instructor
  • Terms
    • Fall 2017
  • Instructors
    • Mayada Elsabbagh, Keith Murai, Yong Rao, David Stellwagen, Megha M Chakravarty, Boris Bernhardt, Bratislav Misic, Catherine E Ferland-Legault, Arkady Khoutorsky, Carl P Ernst, Tie Yuan Zhang, Kai-Florian Storch, Nicolas Cermakian, Hemant K Paudel, Howard Chertkow, Edith Hamel, Brian Chen, Reza Farivar-Mohseni, Mark Brandon, Sylvain Williams, Adrien F Peyrache

NEUR 604 (Neurscience Seminar 3)

NEUR 604

3 credits
Neuroscience Seminar 3.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: Advanced seminars in neurobiology emphasizing current concepts of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying disease of the nervous system and muscle and how the study of disease has contributed to our understanding of cell biology. Topics: genetic mutations responsible for diseases, mechanisms of selective vulnerability of cell populations, and environmental influences.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Symbols:
  • Taught only in alternate years
  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Heather D Durham, Gary A Armstrong

NEUR 606 (Methods in Neuroimaging)

NEUR 606

3 credits
Methods in Neuroimaging.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: An introduction to the design and analysis of neuroimaging experiments in humans.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Fall
  • Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
  • Terms
    • Fall 2017
  • Instructors
    • Jorge Armony

NEUR 507 (Topics in Radionucleotide Imaging)

NEUR 507

3 credits
Topics in Radionuclide Imaging.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: The course deals with neuroreceptor and oncologic imaging and imaging of cerebral bloodflow and metabolism. The role of radiochemistry and physics will be demonstrated in the context of clinical and research applications. Understanding how radiochemistry and physics intermingle with the medical aspects of radiotracer development will result in a deeper insight into the complex pathways of tracer design and the methods necessary to properly interpret the data obtained.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Fall
  • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken NEUR 607.
  • Terms
    • Fall 2017
  • Instructors
    • Alexey Kostikov, Alexander Thiel

NEUR 560 (History of Neuroscience)

NEUR 560

3 credits
History of Neuroscience.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: A historical survey of neuroscience, from antiquity to the major discoveries of the 20th century. Conceptual and technical advances having led to our current understanding of brain function and dysfunctions will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to sensory systems and cognitive processes.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Fall
  • Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Naguib Mechawar, Joseph Rochford

NEUR 502 (Basic and Clinical Aspects of Neuroimmunology)

NEUR 502

3 credits
Basic and Clinical Aspects of Neuroimmunology.

Neurology and Neurosurgery: The role of inflammation in physiological function of the nervous system, as well as in a broad range of neurological diseases where inflammation can act as a contributing factor to the development of pathology or promote recovery, including fundamentals of neuroimmunology to molecular/cellular aspects of neuroinflammation underlying the pathology seen in clinical conditions.

Offered by: Neurology and Neurosurgery

  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Ji Zhang

 

 

NEUROSCIENCE GRADUATE COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Biology

Biol 532 (Developmental Neurobiology Seminar)

BIOL 532

3 credits
Developmental Neurobiology Seminar.

Biology (Sci): Discussions of all aspects of nervous system development including pattern formation, cell lineage, pathfinding and targeting by growing axons, and neural regeneration. The basis for these discussions will be recent research papers and other assigned readings.

Offered by: Biology

  • Winter
  • 1 hour lecture, 2 hours seminar
  • Prerequisites: BIOL 303 or BIOL 306 or permission of instructor
  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Donald Van Meyel, Artur Kania, Alyson Elise Fournier

Biol 546 (Genetics of Model Systems)

BIOL 546

3 credits
Genetics of Model Systems.

Biology (Sci): Topics in the genetics and molecular genetics of unicellular, plant, invertebrate and vertebrate models systems.

Offered by: Biology

  • Terms
    • This course is not scheduled for the 2017 academic year
  • Instructors
    • There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017 academic year

Biol 580 (Genetic Approaches to Neural Systems)

BIOL 580

3 credits
Genetic Approaches to Neural Systems.

Biology (Sci): This course will focus on recent research employing genetic-based methods to examine the functional and structural properties of the nervous system. The focus will be on approaches for studying neural circuits and behavior in a range of model organisms. Topics will include recent technological advances, such as optogenetics for modifying and controlling neuronal activity, and animal models of neurological diseases. Students will critically analyze the application of these methods to current research through in-class discussion of primary literature, student presentations, and written assignments.

Offered by: Biology

  • Prerequisite(s): BIOL 306 or permission of the instructors.
  • Terms
    • Fall 2017
  • Instructors
    • Shelton M Hendricks

BIOL 588 (Advances in Molecular/Cellular Neurobiology)

BIOL 588

3 credits
Advances in Molecular/Cellular Neurobiology.

Biology (Sci): Discussion of fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying the general features of cellular neurobiology. An advanced course based on lectures and on a critical review of primary research papers.

Offered by: Biology

  • Fall
  • 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours seminar
  • Prerequisite: BIOL 300 and BIOL 306 or permission
  • Symbols:
  • Taught only in alternate years
  • Terms
    • This course is not scheduled for the 2017 academic year
  • Instructors
    • There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017 academic year

 

Psychology

PSYC 526 (Advances in Visual Perception)

PSYC 526

3 credits
Advances in Visual Perception.

Psychology: We examine in detail the structure of the visual system, and its function as reflected in the perceptual abilities and behaviour of the organism. Parallels are also drawn with other sensory systems to demonstrate general principles of sensory coding.

Offered by: Psychology

  • Winter
  • 2 lectures
  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Frederick A A Kingdom, Kathleen T Mullen

PSYC 710

PSYC 710

3 credits
Comparative and Physiological Psychology 1.

Psychology: Advanced area seminar on a topic in comparative and physiological psychology.

Offered by: Psychology

  • Terms
    • This course is not scheduled for the 2017 academic year
  • Instructors
    • There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017 academic year

 

Physiology

PHGY 556 (Topics in Systems Neuroscience)

PHGY 556

3 credits
Topics in Systems Neuroscience.

Physiology: Topics of current interest in systems neurophysiology and behavioural neuroscience including: the neural representation of sensory information and motor behaviours, models of sensory motor integration, and the computational analysis of problems in motor control and perception. Students will be expected to present and critically discuss journal articles in class.

Offered by: Physiology

  • Winter
  • Restriction: Permission of the instructor required.
  • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PHGY 456
  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Daniel E Guitton, Erik P Cook

 

Medical Physics

MDPH 607 (Introduction to Medical Imaging)

MDPH 607

3 credits
Medical Imaging.

Medical Physics: This course is concerned with the principles of medical imaging as applied to conventional diagnostic radiography, X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The course emphasizes a linear system approach to the formation, processing, and display of medical images.

Offered by: Medical Physics Unit

  • Terms
    • Fall 2017
  • Instructors
    • Ives Levesque

 

Desautels Faculty of Management

MRKT 709 (Decision Neuroscience Seminar in Marketing - Restricted to PhD Students)

MRKT 709

3 credits
Decision-Neuroscience.

Marketing: Decision neuroscience may be utilized to offer information about expected investor behaviour and provide a due diligence tool for measuring asset managers' potential abilities. Experimental directions covered will include neuroscience studies of decision-making at the individual level, including the brain mechanisms behind risk, reward and punishment learning, valuation, motivation, and self control.

Offered by: Management

  • Terms
    • Fall 2017
  • Instructors
    • Laurette Dube

Psychiatry

PSYT 500 (Advances: Neurobiology of Mental Disorders)

PSYT 500

3 credits
Advances: Neurobiology of Mental Disorders.

Psychiatry: Current theories on the neurobiological basis of most well known mental disorders (e.g. schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, dementia). Methods and strategies in research on genetic, physiological and biochemical factors in mental illness will be discussed. Discussion will also focus on the rationale for present treatment approaches and on promising new approaches.

Offered by: Psychiatry

  • Winter
  • 3 hours
  • Prerequisite (Undergraduate): BIOC 212 and BIOC 311, or BIOC 312, or BIOL 200 and BIOL 201, or PHGY 311, or PSYC 308 and an upper-level biological science course with permission of the instructors, or equivalent. Basic knowledge of cellular and molecular biology is required.
  • Restriction: Open to U3 and graduate students only.
  • Restriction: Graduate Studies: strongly recommended for M.Sc. students in Psychiatry.
  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Tak Pan Wong, Lalit K Srivastava

PSYT 515 (Advanced Studies in Addiction)

PSYT 515

3 credits
Advanced Studies in Addiction.

Psychiatry: Critical assessment of research tools, reported data, and theoretical perspectives on drug addiction, with an emphasis on multi-factorial and inter-disciplinary approaches.

Offered by: Psychiatry

  • Winter
  • Prerequisite: PSYT 301 or permission from one of the instructors.
  • Restrictions: Priority will be given to graduate students registered in Psychiatry, Psychology or Neuroscience graduate programs. Open to undergraduates who have completed PSYT 301 or an equivalent course. Undergraduates must obtain permission of the instructors before registration. Not open to students who have taken PSYT 615.
  • Terms
    • This course is not scheduled for the 2017 academic year
  • Instructors
    • There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017 academic year

PSYT 630 (Statistics for Neuroscientists)

PSYT 630

3 credits
Statistics for Neurosciences.

Psychiatry: Statistics needed for analysing the types of data generated in a laboratory setting, with emphasis on the neurosciences, will be covered. Hypothesis testing, parametric and non-parametric statistics will be studied with a practical approach, using data generated by the students. Computer analysis will be introduced.

Offered by: Psychiatry

  • Terms
    • Fall 2017
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Joseph Rochford
    • Joseph Rochford

 

Dentistry

DENT 654 (Mechanisms and Management of Pain)

DENT 654

3 credits
Mechanisms and Management of Pain.

Dentistry: Presentation of the neurobiology of pain and analgesia, clinical pain conditions, basic and applied research methods in the study of pain, and the theory and practice of pain management. The course is designed for graduate students interested in pain mechanisms and clinical residents interested in pain management.

Offered by: Dentistry

  • Restriction: Open to all health professionals
  • Terms
    • This course is not scheduled for the 2017 academic year
  • Instructors
    • There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017 academic year

 

Biomedical Engineering/Medical Physics Unit

BMDE 501 (Selected Topics in Biomedical Engineering)

BMDE 501

3 credits
Selected Topics in Biomedical Engineering.

Biomedical Engineering: An overview of how techniques from engineering and the physical sciences are applied to the study of selected physiological systems and biological signals. Using specific biological examples, systems will be studied using: signal or finite-element analysis, system and identification, modelling and simulation, computer control of experiments and data acquisition.

Offered by: Biomedical Engineering

  • (3-0-6)
  • Terms
    • Fall 2017
  • Instructors
    • W Robert J Funnell

BMDE 601 (Functional Neuroimaging Fusion)

BMDE 610

3 credits
Functional Neuroimaging Fusion.

Biomedical Engineering: Biomedical engineering: Multimodal data fusion of electrophysiology and functional neuroimaging data, including: detailed description of source localization methods for Electro- and MagnetoEncephaloGraphy data, analysis of brain hemodynamic activity through simultaneous recordings with electrophysiology, analysis and reconstruction of Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy data, modeling of the neurovascular coupling,validation methodology.

Offered by: Biomedical Engineering

  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Christophe Grova

BMDE 650 (Advanced Medical Imaging)

BMDE 650

3 credits
Advanced Medical Imaging.

Biomedical Engineering: Review of advanced techniques in medical imaging including: fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional MRI, MR angiography and quantitative flow measurement, spiral and dynamic x-ray computed tomography, 2D/3D positron emission tomography (PET), basic PET physiology, tracer kinetics, surgical planning and guidance, functional and anatomical brain mapping, 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging, and medical image processing.

Offered by: Biomedical Engineering

  • Terms
    • Winter 2018
  • Instructors
    • Louis Collins

 

Physical and Occupational Therapy

POTH 639 (Motor Control)

POTH 639

3 credits
Motor Control.

Phys & Occ Therapy: Overview of how movement is controlled by the nervous system and how motor skills are learned.

Offered by: Phys and Occ Therapy

  • Restriction: Open only to students registered in the following programs: MSc. (Applied) in Occupational Therapy, MSc. (Applied) in Physical Therapy and MSc. in Rehabilitation Science. Open to other students by permission of instructor only.
  • Terms
    • Fall 2017
  • Instructors
    • Mindy Levin

 
 

Other departments offering relevant graduate-level courses

Anatomy and Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Human Genetics, Medical Physics Unit, Experimental Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, Pathology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Physical and Occupational Therapy.


 

Exemptions

Requests for course exemptions will be considered only for the following courses:

  • NEUR 630 PRINCIPLES OF NEUROSCIENCE 1
  • NEUR 631 PRINCIPLES OF NEUROSCIENCE 2

There are no credit transfers for core courses, only exemptions; if you are exempt from a core course, you will still have to make up the credits with another course. Students may request exemptions for one or both of these courses.

Students may receive certain exemptions if they can display equivalency.

Course Exemption procedures

• Exemptions will be considered on the basis of content equivalency. That is, an exemption will be granted if and only if it is demonstrated that one or more undergraduate or graduate-level courses successfully completed by the student shares a sufficient degree of content overlap with the IPN core course for which exemption is being requested.
• In the event that a student requests exemptions for two courses, it is the responsibility of the student to provide evidence of equivalency for both courses.
• A course taken at another university can be used as evidence for equivalency for only one McGill course.

The Application Process

• Students must inform IPN (ipn [at] mcgill.ca) that they wish to be considered for an exemption, and indicate the course (or courses) for which an exemption is being sought.
• Students must provide IPN with evidence of content equivalency, these can be:

• Undergraduate courses taken at McGill. In this case student needs only provide a list of the course names and numbers.
• Undergaduate OR graduate courses taken at another university. In this case students must provide an electronic copy of the syllabus for each course.

• In the event that the student requests an exemption for both core courses, the student must supply evidence of equivalency for both.

All of these steps must be taken before the request for exemption will be considered.

The Decision Process

• Applications will be forwarded to the coordinator(s) of the course(s) requested for exemption. The coordinator(s) decide if equivalency has been established. If the decision is negative, the coordinator(s) will provide written feedback justifying the decision.
• The student will be informed of the final decision by IPN.

NEUR 705 (Responsible Conduct of Research)

Image courtesy of Dr. Jo Badge, University of Leicester

 

What is the Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop Series?

 

The IPN's Responsible Conduct of Research Workshops (Course NEUR 705) are the first of their kind at McGill. They are a series of four two-and-a-half hour workshops, held on two dates, on scientific integrity and responsibility. There may well be a wider adoption of this type of class at McGill in the future, because there is a need to train our scientists in integrity and accountability. Dr. Emily Bell, Associate Researcher of the Neuroethics Research Unit, at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM), will be leading the workshops with IPN's own Dr. Joe Rochford. Most of the information on this page comes directly from the syllabus she has put together for IPN.

Course Content, Format and Location

Each session will start with a 35-45 minute lecture following which students will be broken into small groups and participate in a facilitator‐led interactive activity or discussion of a case on the topics at hand. Students will also be provided with a list of resources available to help them deal with research integrity issues. The course will be held at the Montreal Neurological Institute in the deGrandpre Communications Centre. The dates for Fall 2017 are October 12 and 19. The dates for Winter 2018 are March 15 and 22.

Module

Topics covered

1+2

  1. Nature and Science of Integrity
  2. Misconduct in Science
  3. Collaborations and responsible authorship
      
  4. Conflicts of interest

3+4

  1. Data acquisition, interpretation and management
  2. Image manipulation
  3. Mentor and trainee responsibilities
  4. Research with human subjects
  5. Societal responsibility

Who is it for?

The workshops are mandatory for all students who started IPN after the introduction of RCR (September 2010), and will appear on your transcript. Completion of the RCR course NEUR 705 is required for graduation.

Goals of this course

  • To provide you with a familiarity on issues in the responsible conduct of research.
  • To guide you in problem‐solving on these issues.
  • To teach you how to identify and assess ethical issues which may arise in research.
  • To provide you with resources for handling conflicts in research integrity that emerge in your own work and studies.

Registration Information

CRN for the Fall NEUR 705 courses: 15856
CRN for Winter NEUR 705 courses: 12214

Why is IPN doing this?

Plainly put, Science is under attack globally. Public perception and understanding of science is perhaps at an all time low. Phenomena, that are ubiquitously accepted by scientists, are disbelieved by as much as 50% of the population. Alarmingly, among the developed countries, this holds especially true in the USA and UK. Incidents where the integrity of researchers is questioned or discredited harm us all. Therefore, we as scientists have a responsibility to conduct research in a responsible and accountable manner.

In an October 2010 report, the Council of Canadian Academies Expert Panel on Research Integrity concluded that there are existing gaps in the policy and practice of research integrity at Canadian institutions (Council of Canadian Academies, 2010). McGill University’s own policy, the Regulation on the Conduct of Research stresses the researcher (student’s) responsibility to uphold basic tenets such as “high scientific and ethical standards” in research and scholarship and the principles of honesty, integrity, trust and accountability in their work (http://www.mcgill.ca/research/about/integrity/).

In the context of neuroscience research, there is often great public interest in the results of research, and enormous potential for research results to shape how we understand the brain and mental function. For us, there is a huge need to reflect on principles which guide responsible conduct in neuroscience research, to guard against its potential misuse, and to be aware of the ethical imperatives of our research.