Finding newspapers

Using WorldCat


Newspapers search tips:

When you are searching for newspapers using the catalogue, please keep the following points in mind:

  • Newspapers may be listed under "Journal" or "eJournal", and occasionally a newspaper may have multiple records. For example, you may see two records for the same eNewspaper title, with each record showing different links.
  • Some newspapers have changed titles over time. For example, The Montreal Gazette was also know at various points in time as just The Gazette, as well as the Montreal Gazette and Commercial Advertiser. You may need to search for your newspaper using more than one name, depending on what time-frame you are researching.
  • eNewspapers are not hosted by McGill. We have access to them through external providers. This means that eNewspaper links lead to pages that are not part of the McGill library website.
 

If you cannot find the record are looking for and need assistance, please Ask a Librarian about it. We are more than happy to help!

 

Step 1: Enter search terms

Screenshot of the main library page, with the word "Guardian" typed in to the WorldCat search box

Type in the name of the title you are look for in the WorldCat search box on the main library page, and press "Search".

 

Screenshot of the search result page, with the search limit section on the left side pointed out with an arrow, and the "Show More link" circled

On your search results page, you will see a section on the left side titled "Format", pointed out here with an arrow. This section allows you to choose which types of item formats will appear in your search results. Right now nothing is checked, so your search contains all possible results. You can see the whole list of limits by clicking on the "Show More" link.

Step 2: Limit your search to Newspapers

Screenshot of the search result page, with the search limit section on the left side pointed out with an arrow, and the limits “Newspaper” and “eNewspaper” circled

Now, limit your search results by choosing the one of the options on the left side of the page under the "Format" section. There are several ways to do this:

  • You can choose "Newspapers", which automatically includes both print, digital newspapers and microform.
  • You can choose "eNewspaper", which includes only online newspapers.
  • You can choose "Newspapers" and than deselect "eNewspapers" (as it automatically gets checked when you select "Newspapers") to remove online holdings from your search. This will let you search for print, computer files and microform copies of newspapers.

By clicking in the box next to the word "Newspaper" or "eNewspaper", a small checkmark should appear. This means your selection was successful, and your search results will be updated automatically.


Step 3: Go to the Newspaper document

 

Screenshot of the search results for the word "guardian" showing the various links you can use to access the document itself, or information about it.  Number 1 is next to a link that says "View Now", number 2 is next to a link that says "View all editions", number 3 is next to the title,  and number 4 is next to a link that says "View all formats and languages"

  • Via the Search Results Page:

The number 1Clicking on the "View Now" shows you a list of external links which go directly to the newspaper content. There may be more than one link in the list. Each leads to the same newspaper title, but they do not all have the same content or the same available dates. For example, newspaper articles at Factiva don't include the accompanying images, but a digital newspaper at ProQuest Historical will likely have more back issues, include the original accompanying images, as well as showing the original layout. This means you can try several links to see which kind of content works best for you.

The number 2Clicking on the "View All Editions" link  brings you to a list of the newspaper formats that the library owns. This allows you to see if we have microform copies.

The number 3Clicking on the title brings you to the detailed catalogue record.

The number 4Clicking on the "View Formats and Languages" link brings you to a list of available formats and languages. This is the same page as seen through the "View All Editions" link.

 

Screenshot of the detailed catalogue record, with an arrowing pointing out the links to the online newspaper editions.

  • Via the Catalogue Record:

Additionally, the detailed catalogue record also lists the links to the online newspaper editions. You may see dates written after each link. These are only approximations, but they'll give you an idea of what period of time that link covers.

 

Screenshot of the New York Times detailed record, with an arrow pointing out the "Find a copy in the library" section, and numbers pointing to parts of that section. Number 1 is next to the part discussing our microfilm holdings, number 2 is next to the Request/Locate button, and number 3 is next to the part which talks about the print copy of the New York Times.

If you are looking for a print copy of a newspaper, microform or other physical items like CD-Roms, looking at the catalogue record under the section "Find a copy in the library" will show you where the item is located. There may be multiple items listed, such as numerous volumes of microfilm. This example shows the record for the New York Times.

the number oneThis part of the record mentions that the microfilm is located in closed storage. This means that in order to use the microfilm, you have to make a request that it be retrieved, and then someone will bring it up from storage for you.

The number twoIf you would like to have an item retrieved, you can click the 'Request/Locate" button. This will bring you a page where you can request the item or items that you need.

The number threeThis part of the record mentions that we have print copies of this newspaper, and notes where you can find them. In this case, you can find print copies of the New York Times on the main floor of the Humanities and Social Science Library.


If you notice an error in our catalogue, please notify us through the Report a Problem form.

Using the Classic Catalogue


If you are searching for newspapers using the Classic Catalogue, please keep in mind that it does not include eNewspapers. If you are looking for an online version of a print newspaper, or a digitized newspaper, you need to search using WorldCat instead.

Searching using the classic catalogue is similar to searching using WorldCat.

 

Step 1: Enter search terms

Screenshot of the classic catalgue main page, with an arrow pointing to the "Advanced" tab.

To search only for newspapers, go to the Advanced search page by clicking on the tab at the top of the page called "Advanced".

 

Screenshot of the advanced search page, which shows the search box pointed to by a red arrow, and the search limit titled "Types of Materials" pointed to by a purple arrow.

Enter your search terms in the search box indicated by the red arrow. Then click on the drop down menu pointed to by the purple arrow, which is titled "Types of Materials".

Step 2: Limit your search to Newspapers

Screenshot of the "Types of Material" submenu, showing a list of materials that you can select as search limits, such DVD, Film, Map, Print, etc..

Now, limit your search to newspapers by clicking the word "Newspaper" on the "Types of Materials" list. Once you have selected it, click the search button at the bottom of the page.


Step 3: Go to the Newspaper document

 

Screenshot of the search results for the term "New York Times", limited to newspapers.

Once you have your search results, you need to click on the title of the document you are looking for to see the detailed catalogue record. For example, this image shows the search results for the term "New York Times", limited to newspapers as shown in the previous step. The title for the New York Times is indicated here with a red arrow, and clicking this will bring up the detailed record.

 

Screenshot of the detailed catalogue record for the New York Times, showing the location info as indicated by a red arrow.

Here is the detailed catalogue record for the New York Times. The location info is pointed to by the arrow. This particular record tells you that there is a print copy of the newspaper, as well as microfilm, both available for in-library use at the Humanities and Social Science library.

 

 

Using Factiva


Simple Search

 

Screenshot of the Factiva simple search bar, which you can find on the home page.

This is the simple search bar on the home page. To start a search, type in the keyword or keywords you want to look for in the search bar, than press "Search". It works just like a web search engine.

 

Screenshot of the options menu, which open just underneath the search bar when you click the options link on the right.

If you press the "options" link on the right side of the bar, a menu will open up that allows you to limit your search in a few simple ways. You do not have to use these options, but they are there if you need them.

oneYou can choose whether you want to search all news sources or certain types, like Dow Jones newwires, press releases, etc.

TwoYou can choose whether you want to limit your search results by date.

Three

If you want to include blogs and boards in your results, you can do that by ticking the box labelled "Include additional Blogs and Boards".

 


Free Text Search:

 

Screenshot of the Factiva free text search bar, found under the "Search" option on the top horizontal menu.

The Factiva free text search, which is found under the "Search" option on the top menu, works a little like the simple search, except there are more search limits you can apply.

 

Screenshot of the free text search bar. The word "Prime Minister" is entered.

You enter the keywords in the search bar, like with the simple search. Here we are searching for "Prime Minister".

 


Adding search limits: how to search for keywords in a particular title or news source

 

Screenshot of the Factiva free text search page, pointing out the arrow which brings up search limit  menu for "Source".

You can limit your search to a specific title. For example, we can decide to only search for articles containing the word "Prime Minister" that have been published in the Montreal Gazette. To do this, first open the search limit menu for "Source" by clicking on the small arrow located next to it.

 

Screenshot of the Factiva source limit menu, showing the dropdown menu for "Select source category".

Now, you can choose your news source. You can select your source in several ways, such as by language, industry or region, if you click on the drop down menu next to "Select source category".

 

Screenshot of the Factiva source limit menu, showing the small search bar into which you can enter the name of a title.

You can also start typing in a name in the small search bar and a list of matches will appear. Here we have typed in "Montr", and the Montreal Gazette has appeared in the list of choices.

 

Screenshot of the source limit menu, showing the sour "Montreal Gazette" highlighted with a cursor on it. If you click the name, than it will be added to the search as a limit. You will then only see articles from the Montreal Gazette.

In order to add the Montreal Gazette as a news source to your search, you need to click on it. If if has been successfully added you will see it now listed above the small search box in an orange rectangle. This means that your search will only show articles containing your keyword(s) from the Montreal Gazette.

 


Adding search limits: Looking at details about a news source

 

Screenshot showing the source limit search menu, highlighting the fact that there are two sources listed as the Montreal Gazette

You'll notice that there are actually two Montreal Gazettes on the list. This is because one refers to the newspaper in print, and the other refers to the website for the Montreal Gazette. The icon listed in front of the same tells you the source's origin. (In this case, you can see a tiny newspaper page versus a world icon. The world icon represents a website.) You can also see details about the source by clicking on the "i" after the name.

 

Here are the news source details that appear for the Montreal Gazette:Newspaper when you click on the "i".

Screenshot of the source details for the Montreal Gazette:Newspaper

Here are the news source details that appear for the Montreal Gazette:Website when you click on the "i".

Screenshot of the source details for the Montreal Gazette:website.

 


Adding search limits: Removing a search limit

 

Screenshot of the source "Montreal Gazatte", once it has been added to the search, with an arrow pointing out the submen that appears when you click on it.

If you would like to remove a news source that you have added, click anywhere on the orange rectangle that surrounds the news source's name and a submenu will pop up. You have the choice of adding "Not" to the news source, which means that the search will find everything except articles from the news source, or you can choose "Remove", to remove it.

 


Adding search limits: Additional limits

 

Screenshot showing other search limits applied in the same process as "Source", in this case language = english, and region = north america.

You can add a search limit for each of the categories in the same away as described for news source. For example, "Region" is set to North America, and "Language" is set to English.

 


Adding search limits: Adding a date range

 

Screenshot of the date search limit menu, found by clicking on the arrow to the right of the word "Date".

You can also add a date range to your search. Underneath the search box is a option to limit the search to a specific time or time period. Clicking on the arrow to the right of the word "Date" opens up a dropdown, where you can select various options, including the option to enter your own specific date range (the last option).

 


Running and modifying the search

 

Screenshot of the completed search, with an arrow pointing out the "Search" button on the right.

Now that the search is built, we can run it by pressing "Search".

 

Screenshot of the search results, with an arrow pointing out the modify search button on the top right.

These are the results of the search. If you need to change your search, you can click the "Modify Search" button on the top right, which will bring up the search box and search limit menu again.

 


Seeing all articles from a particular news source: searching without keywords

Screenshot of the Factiva source limit menu, showing the small search bar into which you can enter the name of a title.

If you would like to see all articles published by a particular news source, you need to search in a specific way. First, you need to locate the name of the news source in the source limit section. You can do this the same way that is mentioned above, in Limiting keywords to a particular news source.

 

Screenshot of the Factiva source limit menu, showing the small purple arrow that appears next to source names in the source limit menu

Now, instead of clicking directly on the news source name, click on the small arrow located after the name. This will add the news sources name to the search bar at the top of the page.

 

Screenshot of the free text searh page, with a news source name in code in the search bar. It reads rst=mtlg.

Now if you run the search by clicking the search button, your results will all the articles from the news source you selected.

 

Screenshot of the search bar, showing a date range added in the "Date" limit section.

You can also add a date range if you are looking for all articles from that news source for a specific time period.
 

 

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