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Artificial intelligence predicts dementia before onset of symptoms

Imagine if doctors could determine, many years in advance, who is likely to develop dementia. Such prognostic capabilities would give patients and their families time to plan and manage treatment and care. Thanks to artificial intelligence research conducted at McGill University, this kind of predictive power could soon be available to clinicians everywhere.

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Published: 22 Aug 2017

Searching for the “signature” causes of BRCAness in breast cancer

By Tom Ulrich from the Broad Institute

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Published: 22 Aug 2017

Hypertension during pregnancy may affect women’s long-term cardiovascular health

Women who experience hypertension during pregnancy face an increased risk of heart disease and hypertension later in life, according to a new study.

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Published: 21 Aug 2017

MUHC study calls for action to help adolescents with diabetes transition to adult care

Adolescence can be a turbulent period of life, with struggles to establish autonomy, identity issues and risk-taking behaviours. For young adults with a chronic illness such as type 1 diabetes, this transition phase also brings about other challenges as they assume an increased responsibility for their overall health....

Published: 17 Aug 2017

CFI invests $4.2 million to boost 23 McGill research projects with cutting-edge labs and equipment

At Laurentian University today, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, announced a total investment of $52 million from the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) John R. Evans Leaders Fund for 220 new infrastructure projects nationally....

Published: 15 Aug 2017

Could olfactory loss point to Alzheimer’s disease?

By the time you start losing your memory, it's almost too late. That's because the damage to your brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) may already have been going on for as long as twenty years. Which is why there is so much scientific interest in finding ways to detect the presence of the disease early on. Scientists now believe that simple odour identification tests may help track the progression of the disease before symptoms actually appear, particularly among those at risk.

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Published: 15 Aug 2017

Stress heightens fear of threats from the past

Recognizing threats is an essential function of the human mind — think “fight or flight” — one that is aided by past negative experiences. But when older memories are coupled with stress, individuals are likely to perceive danger in harmless circumstances, according to a paper published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Published: 8 Aug 2017

Newly discovered pathway for pain processing could lead to new treatments

The discovery of a new biological pathway involved in pain processing offers hope of using existing cancer drugs to replace the use of opioids in chronic pain treatment, according to scientists at McGill University.

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Published: 8 Aug 2017

Playing with your brain

Human-computer interactions, such as playing video games, can have a negative impact on the brain, says a new Canadian study published in Molecular Psychiatry. For over 10 years, scientists have told us that action video game players exhibit better visual attention, motor control abilities and short-term memory. But, could these benefits come at a cost?

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Published: 8 Aug 2017

Speeding up SSRIs

For people suffering from depression, a day without treatment can seem like a lifetime. A new study explains why the most commonly prescribed antidepressants can take as long as six weeks to have an effect. The findings could one day lead to more effective and faster acting drugs.

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Published: 3 Aug 2017

UAlberta and McGill scientists uncover a hidden calcium cholesterol connection

By Ross Neitz, University of Alberta

It’s well known that calcium is essential for strong bones and teeth, but new research shows it also plays a key role in moderating another important aspect of health—cholesterol.

Scientists at the University of Alberta and McGill University have discovered a direct link between calcium and cholesterol, a discovery that could pave the way for new ways of treating high blood cholesterol. 

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Published: 26 Jul 2017

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