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T. rex was a champion walker, super-efficient at lower speeds

While smaller dinosaurs needed speed, huge predators like T. rex were optimized for energy-efficient walking, according to a study published in PLOS ONE.

Published: 13 May 2020

Magic of the mind

By Morgan Sweeney

If you had told me five years ago that I would graduate college with a science degree, I would have said you were crazy. Sixteen-year-old Morgan thought science was dry textbooks and boring labs, too much work for things that would never affect her life. Until January 29th, 2017, when a serious knee injury forever transformed my relationship to science.

Published: 29 Apr 2020

Smash hit food chemistry course to run in summer 2020

For the first time ever, McGill University will run a summer-semester version of CHEM 181, its enormously popular course on the chemistry of food.

Enrolments are now open for a June 2020 edition of the course that has been taken by tens of thousands of students over its nearly 40-year history.

Making sense of food

Published: 27 Apr 2020

Potential energy saving solution for making vital chemicals

Researchers at McGill University have discovered a new, energy-efficient way to make key ingredients for the production of pharmaceuticals, polymers and fine chemicals.

Published: 17 Apr 2020

Innovative birds are less vulnerable to extinction

Bird species that have the capacity to express novel foraging behaviors are less vulnerable to extinction than species that do not, according to a collaborative study involving McGill University and CREAF Barcelona and published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

Published: 6 Apr 2020

Undergraduate students ‘stars of the show’ at first ever poster showcase event

By Nicole George

Academia Week 2020 began with an Undergraduate Poster Showcase, sponsored by the Office of Science Education (OSE), Science Undergraduate Society (SUS), and Teaching and Learning Services (TLS).

Published: 1 Apr 2020

McGill's Chemistry Outreach Group wins Principal's Prize

The Chemistry Outreach Group has taken home the Principal’s Prize for Public Engagement through Media, winning the inaugural 'Collaboration' category for groups of undergraduate or graduate students that engage with the external community and/or the media.

Published: 13 Mar 2020

New technique for measuring greenhouse gas production from thawing permafrost

A research team led by McGill University geochemist Peter Douglas has used a new method for measuring the rate at which methane is produced by microbes breaking down thawing permafrost. The breakthrough could lead to an improvement in our ability to predict future releases of the potent greenhouse gas as long‑frozen layers of soil begin to thaw.

Published: 11 Mar 2020

NEWSWEEK | Glyphosate herbicide roundup triggers loss of biodiversity among freshwater algae

The glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup has been found to trigger the loss of biodiversity among phytoplankton communities in freshwater ponds. In their experiments, scientists found that while some populations developed resistance to the herbicide and were able to survive exposure at high levels, this came at a cost, with a 40 percent loss in biodiversity.

Published: 4 Mar 2020

Making straws that don’t suck for the environment

With the federal ban of single-use plastics planned for this year, the demand for alternatives to everyday plastic products, such as straws, is set to increase. TreeMaTech, a startup company born through a collaboration between chemistry professors from McGill and Lakehead University, is betting on cellulose for making drinking straws that don’t suck for the environment.

Published: 2 Mar 2020

Fossilized wing gives clues about Labrador’s biodiversity during the Cretaceous

A fossilised insect wing discovered in an abandoned mine in Labrador has led palaeontologists from McGill University and the University of Gdańsk to identify a new hairy cicada species that lived around 100 million years ago.

Published: 21 Feb 2020

New technique nets scientists haul of key proteins

Using a new microscopic "fishing" technique, scientists from the Montreal Clinical Research Institute (IRCM), Université de Montréal and McGill University have successfully snagged thousands of proteins that play a key role in the formation of the cell skeletons or cytoskeletons. Cell skeletons, whose primary function is to give the cells their shapes, are also involved in things like muscle contraction.

Published: 9 Jan 2020

Introducing SUS Academia Week x OSE

By Cynthia Feng and Kira Smith

Office of Science Education team members Cynthia Feng and Kira Smith are working with members of the Science Undergraduate Society (SUS) on planning the next edition of the SUS’s highly anticipated Academia Week.

Published: 9 Jan 2020

A fast radio burst tracked down to a nearby galaxy

Astronomers in Europe, working with members of Canada’s CHIME Fast Radio Burst collaboration, have pinpointed the location of a repeating fast radio burst (FRB) first detected by the CHIME telescope in British Columbia in 2018. The breakthrough is only the second time that scientists have determined the precise location of a repeating source of these millisecond bursts of radio waves from space.

Published: 6 Jan 2020

Perpetual predator-prey population cycles

How can predators coexist with their prey over long periods without the predators completely depleting the resource that keeps them alive? Experiments performed over a period of 10 years by researchers from McGill University and the Universities of Oldenburg and Potsdam have now confirmed that regular oscillations in predator-prey populations can persist over very long periods

Published: 18 Dec 2019

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