In the Headlines

When Mahoutian started his PhD in civil engineering at McGill University in Montreal in 2011, his goal was to find a material that would sequester carbon, trapping it before it could get into the atmosphere. Instead, he came up with a new recipe for making concrete. “We totally get rid of cement,” he says. “Instead we use slag, the waste material of steel-producing plants.” The slag is calcium silicate. When wet calcium silicate is injected with CO2 gas, calcium carbonate, or limestone, forms. Limestone and the aggregate form Carbicrete.

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Published on: 18 May 2017

Four years after the attack, Shingali and his family have escaped grave bodily harm. But like thousands of other exiled Yezidis, they are still dealing with the psychological aftermath of a forced migration that tore families apart. When political or religious violence drives people from their homes, “there’s confusion, loss, a rupturing of all sorts of bonds,” says cultural psychiatrist Laurence Kirmayer of McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

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Published on: 17 May 2017

Dr. Milner, a professor of psychology in the department of neurology and neurosurgery at McGill University in Montreal, is best known for discovering the seat of memory in the brain, the foundational finding of cognitive neuroscience. But she also has a knack for picking up on subtle quirks of human behavior and linking them to brain function — in the same way she had her own, during the driving test.

Read more: The New York Times

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Published on: 16 May 2017

Each year McGill University proudly confers honorary degrees to highly talented and engaged individuals who serve as an inspiration for the community of students, professors, researchers and staff. This year, McGill will honour two Nobel prizes winners, Arthur McDonald and Paul Nurse, and two former prime ministers of Canada, the Right Honourable Paul Martin and the Right Honourable Brian Mulroney. The school will celebrate the passion and creativity of two Quebec artists: filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin and Maestro Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

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Published on: 15 May 2017

In receiving one of its largest donations, McGill University announced plans Friday for a new retail management school with global ambitions through a $25-million gift from the family foundation of a Moroccan-born immigrant who came to Montreal in the 1960s and built an international footwear empire.

Read more: The Globe and Mail

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Published on: 12 May 2017

This research suggests that when managers are staffing, organizing, and managing knowledge projects, they should embrace flexible organization of expertise — based on the needs of the project phase — in order to maximize team performance.

Op-ed co-written by Samer Faraj, professor, Canada Research Chair in Technology, Management, and Healthcare and Director, Desautels PhD program, at McGill University

Read more: Harvard Business Review

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Published on: 11 May 2017

Scientists at Montreal's McGill University have added to the common theory about how the Earth's crust was created. Don Baker and Kassandra Sofonio looked into a theory that not all of the Earth's crust was formed from the inside out, but that some of the crust fell to Earth from the atmosphere, Baker told CBC News in an interview. He described it as "raining marbles," or silicate rain, formed by the high temperatures on the Earth's surface.

Read more: CBC News

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Published on: 10 May 2017

According to Albert Berghuis, the best way to design new treatments to combat drug-resistant bacteria is to think small. Chair of the department of biochemistry at McGill University's College of Medicine, Berghuis has been studying drug-resistant superbugs with the help of the Canadian Light Source synchrotron in Saskatoon.

Read more: CBC News

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Published on: 9 May 2017

(Op-ed by Professor Suzanne Fortier, Principal and Vice-chancellor of McGill University) “One of the indelible elements of the Silicon Valley origin story is the role Stanford University played in both generating entrepreneurial renegades and providing the academic infrastructure to feed a permanent culture of innovation. That model of the university as a supercluster anchor now pertains from Cambridge to Waterloo. McGill Principal Suzanne Fortier deftly lays out the components of that dynamic, from the university’s point of view.”

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Published on: 8 May 2017

The demonstration, by a team of McGill researchers, is paving the way for future convoys of autonomous airborne and land-based machines that could some day be deployed in remote locations to monitor, transport or assist in search and rescue without the need for constant human supervision.

Read more: The Globe and Mail


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Published on: 5 May 2017

“Abrupt and expensive” is a matter of perspective, says Catherine Potvin, a professor at McGill University and the Canada Research Chair in Climate Change Mitigation and Tropical Forests. She emphasizes that Canada is a nation of believers.

Read more: The Globe and Mail

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Published on: 4 May 2017

Chris Barrington-Leigh, a professor at McGill University’s School of Environment, has done an analysis of the potential for growth in renewable energy production in Canada, said 2015 was a record year for new installations of renewable energy around the world. He called Canada’s renewable growth “a good start” but said the aim is to get to 100 per cent.

Read more: The Globe and Mail

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Published on: 3 May 2017

Monday marks the beginning of the Canadian Mental Health Association’s Mental Health Week. This is an opportune moment to raise awareness of problems faced by people with mental illness.

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Published on: 2 May 2017

Priests of Prosperity is an analytical study of the evolution of central banking in postcommunist countries, exploring the unsung revolutionary campaign to move from command-economy cash cows into Western-style monetary guardians. This book argues that a powerful transnational central banking community concentrated in Western Europe and North America integrated postcommunist bankers to shape their ideas about the role of central banks and to help them develop modern tools of banking.

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Published on: 2 May 2017

“The aim is not placement,” says Marie-José Beaudin, executive director of the Soutar Career Centre at McGill University’s Desautels Faculty of Management. Instead, the goal is to equip students with career-long skills in networking. “Your career can’t evolve in a silo,” she says. “You need to have champions who support that and mentors can be fantastic.”

Read more: The Globe and Mail

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Published on: 28 Apr 2017

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