Dept. of Medicine

By Shawn Hayward, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital

Discovery will aid development of treatments for this debilitating disease

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (MNI) have identified novel gene mutations that cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a step forward in efforts to treat this debilitating disease.

Classified as: Guy Rouleau, MNI, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, HSP, hereditary spastic paraplegia, gene mutation, debilitating disease, weakness, spasticity, CanHSP, Canadian Institutes for Health Research
Published on: 10 May 2016

McGill Newsroom

CREATE project to prepare graduates for high-skills work in surgical-devices industry

A team led by McGill University professor Jake Barralet will receive $1.65 million from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to provide nearly 90 students with cross-disciplinary training to prepare them for high-skill jobs in the surgical devices industry.

Classified as: Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, NSERC, Collaborative Research and Training Experience, science and technology, surgical-devices industry, Jake Barralet, Greg Fergus, Science and Economic Development, Rosie Goldstein
Published on: 14 Apr 2016

McGill University Health Centre

RI-MUHC will lead an innovative pan-Canadian network that aims to improve life outcomes for children with brain-based development disabilities

RI-MUHC will lead an innovative pan-Canadian network that aims to improve life outcomes for children with brain-based development disabilities

Classified as: children, disabilities, McGill University Health Centre, health and lifestyle, Annette Majnemer, brain-based development disabilities, SPOR, Jane Philpott, Steven Miller, Dan Goldowitz
Published on: 31 Mar 2016

McGill Newsroom

McGill, UCLA study of low- and middle-income countries shows paid maternity leave policies could help prevent infant deaths

For each additional month of paid maternity leave offered in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), infant mortality is reduced by 13%, according to a new study by researchers from McGill University and UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

Classified as: Biostatistics, Jody Heymann, Department of Epidemiology, health and lifestyle, maternity, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, PLoS Medicine, child death, maternal death, and Occupational Health, McGill’s Institute for Health and Social Policy, Arijit Nandi
Published on: 30 Mar 2016

By Julie Robert, McGill University Health Centre

Hip fractures are one of the most common injuries sustained by the elderly population following a fall.

Classified as: Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in Montreal, health and lifestyle
Published on: 4 Mar 2016

By Chris Chipello, McGill Newsroom

Surprisingly complex interactions between neurotransmitter receptors and other key proteins help explain the brain’s ability to process information with lightning speed, according to a new study.

Classified as: brain, Pharmacology, Derek Bowie, Alzheimer, neuron, Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), health and lifestyle, proteins, receptors, macromolecules, Philip Biggin
Published on: 25 Feb 2016

By Tod Hoffman, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research

The use of incretin-based drugs is not associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the latest issue of the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

The research was conducted by the Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effect Studies (CNODES), which used the health records of almost 1 million patients with types 2 diabetes.

Classified as: CIHR, faculty of medicine, health, Cancer, jewish general hospital, Samy Suissa, diabetes, health and lifestyle, health canada, pancreatic cancer, CNODES, drug safety
Published on: 22 Feb 2016

By Cynthia Lee, McGill Newsroom

It’s not unusual for siblings to seem more dissimilar than similar: one becoming a florist, for example, another becoming a flutist, and another becoming a physicist.

Classified as: McGill University, DNA, disease, genes, diversity, bioengineering, health and lifestyle, proteins, brood, isoforms, human cells, splicing, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Yu Xia
Published on: 11 Feb 2016

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom

If you’re fat, can you blame it on your genes? The answer is a qualified yes. Maybe. Under certain circumstances. Researchers are moving towards a better understanding of some of the roots of obesity.

Classified as: food, obesity, health, Laurette Dube, genes, income, eating habits, Fat, health and lifestyle, food and sustainability, skinny, healthy food, wealth, MAVAN birth cohort, JAMA Pediatrics
Published on: 9 Feb 2016

By Cynthia Lee

Newsroom

In real estate, location is key. It now seems the same concept holds true when it comes to stopping pain. New research published in Nature Communications indicates that the location of receptors that transmit pain signals is important in how big or small a pain signal will be -- and therefore how effectively drugs can block those signals.

Classified as: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, pain, chronic pain, Nature Communications, health and lifestyle, spinal cord, painful stimulus, Pain treatment, glutamate receptors, National Institutes of Health, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
Published on: 3 Feb 2016

By Cynthia Lee
Newsroom

Chronic pain may reprogram the way genes work in the immune system, according to a new study by McGill University researchers published in the journal Scientific Reports.  

Classified as: DNA, moshe szyf, medication, immune system, chronic pain, health and lifestyle, Scientific Reports, T cells, Laura Stone, white blood cells
Published on: 28 Jan 2016

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