Mining and Materials Engineering

SURE: Mining & Materials Engineering

Mining
& Materials
Engineering

 

MIN-MAT-001: Characterisation of aluminum alloy 3D printed parts

Professor Mathieu Brochu

mathieu.brochu [at] mcgill.ca
2354

Research Area

Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Components

Description

The project deals with the characterization of 3D printed parts made in aluminum alloys. The student will be part of a research team that studies the solidification event and link it with the microstructural development and the mechanical properties.

Tasks

Performing a series of physical, metallographic and mechanical tests for the characterisation of the printed components and coupons.

 

Deliverables

Weekly presentation in group meeting, Final report

Number of positions

1

Academic Level

Year 3

MIN-MAT-002: Phosphorus Precipitation from Synthetic Municipal Wastewater

Professor Sidney Omelon

sidney.omelon [at] mcgill.ca
2608

Research Area

Waste Phosphorus Recycling

Description

Phosphorus fertilizer is produced uniquely from phosphate rock. Phosphate rock is a phosphorus-rich ore, with the phosphorus as a component of carbonate apatite, which is a type of phosphorus biomineral. Since 2013, when the phosphate rock mine in Kapuskasing, Ontario closed, phosphate rock is no longer mined in Canada. Phosphorus fertilizer producers in Canada presently import phosphate rock from overseas. This project focuses on precipitating carbonate apatite from synthetics municipal wastewater, which is rich in phosphorus. Preliminary data suggest that carbonate apatite can be precipitated from the slurry generated by anaerobic digestion of municipal wastewater sludge. This precipitation requires the capture of carbon dioxide generated by the anaerobic digestion process, and a subsequent precipitation of carbonate apatite. In order to engineer a crystallization process, the supersaturation windows for mineral precipitation must be identified. The supersaturation of carbonate apatite can be estimated by the measurement of free calcium and phosphate concentrations. The optimal concentrations of calcium and phosphate are not known. To generate these data, pH measurement and calcium and phosphate concentration measurements by colourimetry are required for small batch crystallization experiments. Also required is the characterization of the precipitate by powder x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, as well as its solid/liquid separation characteristics. This is a sub-project in a larger research goal to encourage the growth of purple non-sulphur bacteria to generate bioplastic precursors.

Tasks

The student will measure the pH, redox state, calcium and phosphate concentrations of synthetic municipal wastewater in which purple non-sulphur bacteria are being cultured. They will capture synthetic flue gas in a solution, and mix this solution with the digestate in different proportions to precipitate phosphorus-rich solids. They will separate the solids, quantify the separation efficiency, measure the final solution pH, redox, calcium and phosphate concentrations, and identify the minerals in the precipitate.

 

Deliverables

The student will generate the data set for the optimal supersaturation values for carbonate apatite precipitation from synthetic municipal wastewater in which purple non-sulphur bacteria are being grown, and characterize the complex precipitation products, with a focus on solid-liquid separation characteristics.

Number of positions

2

Academic Level

Year 2

MIN-MAT-003: SCDA perfromance under high pressure confinement

Professor Hani Mitri

hani.mitri [at] mcgill.ca
5143984890

Research Area

Rock Mechanics

Description

Blasting with explosives is widely used in the mining industry for mine development and production. However, the use of explosives is associated with rigorous safety and environmental constraints. The focus of this work is on Soundless, Explosive-Free Chemical Demolition Agents ( SCDAs), a more environmentally friendly method for the fragmentation of rock. SCDAs are powdery materials where upon curing and injected in a confined space; generate enough expansive pressure to break the surrounding material such as hard rock. SCDAs are investigated as a potential alternative to explosive blasting for the fragmentation of rock in underground mines.

Tasks

1) Determine the effect of SCDA under high pressure confinement 2) Determine the effect of different borehole sizes filled with SCDA on hard rock 3) Determine the effect of different mine environments on the performance of chemical demolition agents.

 

Deliverables

Weekly presentation of results and final report.

Number of positions

1

Academic Level

Year 1

MIN-MAT-004: Graphene-based three dimensional scaffolds

Professor Marta Cerruti

marta.cerruti [at] mcgill.ca
5142497955
http://biointerfacelab.mcgill.ca/

Research Area

Scaffolds, nanomaterials

Description

In this project we will develop a graphene-based scaffolds with controlled architecture and high porosity for applications that can range from scaffolds for bone tissue engineering to acoustics.

Tasks

Literature review on graphene scaffolds Fabricate and characterize graphene-based scaffolds Test their properties for desired applications to be selected along with student

Deliverables

Literature review Weekly presentations to professor Two group meeting presentations during the summer Written summary of research work at the end of the semester

Number of positions

2

Academic Level

No preference