Graduate Students

Taylor Leger

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2021)
B.Sc. Human Kinetics (Honours), St. Francis Xavier University (2019)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Biomechanics

Personal Statement:

My passion for biomechanics started during my Bachelor of Science in Human Kinetics at St. Francis Xavier University. Under the supervision of Dr. Sasho MacKenzie in the Golf Biomechanics Lab, my honours research investigated the effect of golf shaft alignment on driving performance. This positive experience under Dr. MacKenzie led me to McGill University and the Ice Hockey Research Group under the supervision of Dr. David Pearsall. As ice hockey is a game that is constantly evolving with new equipment and training technologies, I am interested in advancing our understanding of ice hockey biomechanics and make sure that these findings are communicated with coaches and players of all levels.


Matthew Kelly

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2021)
M.Sc. Physiotherapy, Dalhousie University (2017)
B.Sc. Kinesiology, University of Prince Edward Island (2015)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Bimechanics

Personal Statement:

I began my second Masters degree in September 2019 with the Ice Hockey Research Group under the supervision of Dr. David Pearsall. During my final clinical rotation of physiotherapy school, I had the opportunity to work with physiotherapists who instilled in me the importance of research in our field. After working as a physiotherapist for two years, my passion for sports along with my interests in performance and injury prevention has led me to pursue a research focused degree in biomechanics with the IHRG. I hope to integrate my clinical experience with my research experience to provide a better service for clients and to continue building on our knowledge of ice hockey biomechanics.


Harry Brown

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2021)
B.Sc. Sport and Exercise, University of Bath (2018)

Current Research:

- Soccer Kinematics

Personal Statement:

After completing my Bachelors degree in Sport and Exercise from the University of Bath, England, in 2019 I finally saw it fit to make my move across the Atlantic to continue in my higher education. As such, I began my Masters studies in the Kinesiology and Physical Education department under the supervision of Dr. Shawn Robbins and Dr. David Pearsall in the fall of 2019. Understanding the various caveats of human performance has captivated my interest since the beginning of my Bachelors, and having previously worked in performance analysis at the South Australian Sports Institute I gained an appreciation for the skills required which separate those athletes at the top of their sport, and how to apply this knowledge to allow developing elite athletes to progress.  This has since manifested in a keen desire to understand the specific motion patterns of human movement, and the contributing factors which allow elite performers to excel. As such, I am very excited to make this next step and work surrounded by such a talented group of researchers.


Caitlin Mazurek

Ph.D. Biomechanics, McGill University (2022)
M.S. Kinesiology, Point Loma Nazarene University (2017)
B.S. Exercise Science, Saginaw Valley State University (2014)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Skating Biomechanics

Personal Statement:

In Fall 2018, I began doctoral studies in the Ice Hockey Research Group under the supervision of Dr. Shawn Robbins and Dr. David Pearsall. I discovered a passion for biomechanics during my master’s program at Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego, California. Working under Arnel Aguinaldo, I was fortunate to assist with pitching research focusing on segmental energy flow and elbow valgus load with teams such as the Texas Rangers. I also conducted my own master’s research in combat sport biomechanics, evaluating differences in individual cross punch and combination cross punch mechanics. This experience, combined with my lifelong interest in ice hockey ultimately led me to discover the research being done by the IHRG at McGill.


Aaron Manning

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2020)
B.Eng. Engineering Physics (Mechanical Option), Queen’s University (2015)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Biomechanics

Personal Statement:

I began my Masters degree in September 2018, working with the Ice Hockey Research Group under the supervision of Dr. David Pearsall. My undergraduate degree was completed at Queen’s University in Engineering Physics (Mechanical Option) in 2015. I have since spent three years working in mechanical engineering for Hatch Ltd. At Hatch, I was involved with the design, construction and implementation of gold mineral processing equipment. I look forward to my time with the IHRG, where I hope to combine my engineering experience with my passion for innovation, sport and performance.


Aimée Quintana

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2020)
B.Sc. Biomedical Engineering, Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (2017)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Biomechanics

Personal Statement:

I started my Masters in Kinesiology and Physical Education department under the supervision of Dr. David Pearsall in the fall of 2018. I previously completed my bachelor of science degree in Biomedical Engineering at the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education in Mexico. I have always considered that the human body is a perfect machine, kinesiology helps to create an improvement in the maintenance of the physiological capacity of the person and prevention of injuries. Considering this, I would like to relate it to sports regarding to skill performance and safety, with the objective of contributing in the development of new technologies or techniques, seeking to gain experience in the biomechanical field by working and learning from a highly qualified team.


Sean Denroche

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2020)
B.Sc. Kinesiology (Honours), University of Waterloo (2018)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Biomechanics

Personal Statement:

I first became interested in biomechanics while working on my Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology at the University of Waterloo. I spent many hours working in the Biomechanics of Human Mobility Lab under the supervision of Dr. Stacey Acker. In my final year of studies, I conducted an honours research project where I assessed the effect of knee savers on quadriceps muscle activity during simulated baseball catcher postures. My experience in biomechanics at the University of Waterloo, in addition to my passion for sports, led me to pursue graduate studies with Dr. David Pearsall and the McGill Ice Hockey Research Group in the fall of 2018.


picture of PhD student Daniel Aponte

Daniel Aponte

PhD Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2020)
M.Sc. Clinical Exercise Physiology, Concordia University (2013)
B.Sc. Exercise Science, Concordia University (2010)

Current research:

- Short Track Speed Skating and Ice Hockey helmet protection
- Ice Hockey Helmet Fit

Personal Statement:

I began work in the field of biomechanics during my masters degree, when I developed a behavioural paradigm to test the anticipatory postural behaviour in an animal model. Using a custom-built force-plate and video analysis, I used classical conditioning to successfully train rodents to associate a stimulus tone to a platform perturbation. I then worked as a research assistant with Dr. Karen Li, and a research coordinator at the Concordia PERFORM Centre. The projects I worked on with Dr. Li focussed primarily on the effects of aging and mild hearing loss have on posture and cognition.

My doctoral work at the IHRG is in a different branch of biomechanics: protective equipment. I worked on a 3D scanning head and helmet project with the goal of understanding how heads and helmets interface. A spin-off project compared the shape of surrogate headforms used for certification testing and a sample of male head shapes. Currently, I am working with the Institut National du Sport du Québec in an effort to evaluate the impact attenuation ability of short track speed skating helmets. To assess the physical effects of these impacts on the human brain, the impact data will be modeled using a human finite element head model of the brain. The data from these projects will be used to inform future speed skating helmet design

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