Celebrate Data Privacy Day - January 28, 2020

Own your privacy.

Data Privacy Day on January 28 highlights the value of personal information. 

As an official 2020 Data Privacy Day champion, McGill is spreading the word with on-campus events, links to online resources, and tips to help you protect your data.

 

What is Data Privacy Day?

Data Privacy Day commemorates the first legally binding international treaty dealing with privacy and data protection, signed on January 28, 1981. It is observed annually in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

Get involved - upcoming events

Contest and other on-campus events: Throughout the month of January, McGill will be hosting a data privacy contest and a variety of other events promoting awareness of data privacy. View the calendar

Online (live streaming) event: Data Privacy Day: A Vision for the Future

Tuesday, January 28 at 1:00 p.m. EST/10:00 a.m. PST

Promotional image for live streaming event

 

Learn more about data privacy in Canada at the following websites:  

In North America,  Data Privacy Day campaign is officially led by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA).

Privacy Tips:

The more information you share about yourself (as well as your friends and family), the greater the risk of exposure to online threats such as identity theft, cyber-stalking and cyber-bullying. Here are some simple tips on how to protect your online information, identity and privacy.

  1. PERSONAL INFO IS LIKE MONEY: VALUE IT. PROTECT IT.
    Information about you, such as your purchase history or location, has value – just like money. Be thoughtful about who gets that information and how it is collected through apps and websites. You should delete unused apps and accounts, keep others current and review app permissions.
  2. LOCK DOWN YOUR LOGIN:
    Add an extra layer of protection by activating Two-Factor Authentication(2FA) whenever it is available. With 2FA,  even if a cybercriminal steals your password, they won't be able to access your account. Set up 2FA for your McGill account
  3. SHARE WITH CARE.
    Think before posting about yourself and others online. Consider what it reveals, who might see it and how it could be perceived now and in the future. Review your social network friends and all contact lists periodically to ensure everyone is still relevant.
  4. OWN YOUR ONLINE PRESENCE:
    Manage your privacy settings on the devices and online services you use.
  5. SECURE YOUR DEVICES.
    Every device should be encrypted and secured by a strong authentication, such as a password, fingerprint, or facial recognition. These security measures limit access to authorized users only and protect your information if devices are lost or stolen. Learn more about data encryption and creating strong passwords

These tips are provided courtesy of StaySafeOnline.org.

Note: StaySafeOnline.org is an American website that references American privacy laws. Keep in mind that privacy laws in Canada are different from those in the US. However, for the general public, best practices and the dangers associated with privacy remain the same. For further information regarding Canadian privacy laws, please refer to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada website.