More from Society and Culture

classified as:
  • News releases
  • press_releases mcgill.ca/newsroom
  • Society and Culture
  • External
subscribe

Global project to reduce health inequalities in cities around the world

A major new research partnership has been launched to explore ways of reducing health inequalities in cities around the world.   Coordinated from London and funded with £10m (C$17.5 million) from Wellcome Trust, with a global network of expert scientists and practitioners -- including three from McGill University -- the partnership comprises two integrated urban health projects....
Published: 6 Feb 2018

We’re not addicted to smartphones, we’re addicted to social interaction

We all know people who, seemingly incapable of living without the bright screen of their phone for more than a few minutes, are constantly texting and checking out what friends are up to on social media.

These are examples of what many consider to be the antisocial behaviour brought on by smartphone addiction, a phenomenon that has garnered media attention in the past few months and led  investors and consumers to demand that tech giants address this problem.

...
Published: 6 Feb 2018

The high cost of short-term rentals in New York City

A new report from McGill Urban Planning professor David Wachsmuth and his team provides an analysis of Airbnb activity in New York City and the surrounding region in the last three years (September 2014 - August 2017)....
Published: 30 Jan 2018

American cities with large Hispanic populations are less likely to police the police

How individual police forces treat those that they suspect of being illegal immigrants varies greatly from one city to the next in the U.S. In Albuquerque, New Mexico, the police department has a policy that states clearly, “Officers shall not stop, question, detain or arrest any person on the ground that they may be undocumented and deportable foreign nationals.” But this is unusual. Local police departments across the U.S....

Published: 14 Dec 2017

Do birdsong and human speech share biological roots?

Do songbirds and humans have common biological hardwiring that shapes how they produce and perceive sounds?

Scientists who study birdsong have been intrigued for some time by the possibility that human speech and music may be rooted in biological processes shared across a variety of animals. Now, research by McGill University biologists provides new evidence to support this idea.

...
Published: 22 Nov 2017

Claudia Mitchell named Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellow

By Meaghan Thurston

...
Published: 19 Sep 2017

McGill duo honoured by the Royal Society of Canada

The Royal Society of Canada (RSC) announced today that Professor Michel Tremblay (Department of Biochemistry and the Director of the McGill Cancer Institute) has been awarded the McLaughlin Medal for important research of sustained excellence in medical science....
Published: 19 Sep 2017

Teenage aggression linked to neglect

By Katherine Gombay

...
Published: 18 Sep 2017

Playing with your brain

Human-computer interactions, such as playing video games, can have a negative impact on the brain, says a new Canadian study published in Molecular Psychiatry. For over 10 years, scientists have told us that action video game players exhibit better visual attention, motor control abilities and short-term memory. But, could these benefits come at a cost?

...
Published: 8 Aug 2017

“Rebalancing society” module launched

On the occasion of the High Level Political Forum held on 18 and 19 July at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, PRME in collaboration with McGill University and KEDGE Business School are pleased to announce the launch of a new Sustainability Literacy Test (Sulitest) module based on Henry Mintzberg’s book Rebalancing Society.

...
Published: 19 Jul 2017

Crafting better beer

Canada’s extensive malting and brewing industry could get a further boost from new insight into the science of malting.

...
Published: 6 Jul 2017

Teaching practices could play an important role in preventing bullying

Classrooms that encourage competition between students may inadvertently be creating settings where bullying is more likely to take place. That’s one of the conclusions that can be drawn from work led by McGill University researchers Maria Di Stasio and Robert Savage, who recently published a paper on the subject in the Journal of Adolescence. But it’s only part of the story.

...
Published: 23 May 2017

Pages