Major Environment - Earth Sciences and Economics (66 credits)

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Offered by: McGill School of Environment     Degree: Bachelor of Science

Program Requirements

The resources necessary for human society are extracted from the Earth, used as raw materials in our factories and refineries, and then returned to the Earth as waste. Geological processes produce resources humans depend on, and they also determine the fate of wastes in the environment. Understanding Earth's geologic processes provides us with the knowledge to mitigate many of our society's environmental impacts due to resource extraction and waste disposal. Additionally, economics frequently affects what energy sources power our society and how our wastes are treated. Earth sciences and economics are essential for our understanding of the many mechanisms, both physical and social, that affect Earth's environment.

This domain includes the fundamentals of each discipline. Students learn of minerals, rocks, soils, and waters and how these materials interact with each other and with the atmosphere. Fundamental economic theory and the economic effects of public policy toward resource industries, methods of waste disposal, and the potential effects of global warming on the global economy are also explored.

Suggested First Year (U1) Courses

For suggestions on courses to take in your first year (U1), you can consult the "MSE Student Handbook" available on the MSE website (http://www.mcgill.ca/mse), or contact Kathy Roulet, the Program Adviser (kathy.roulet [at] mcgill.ca).

Program Requirements

Note: Students are required to take a maximum of 34 credits at the 200 level and a minimum of 15 credits at the 400 level or higher in this program. This includes core and required courses.

Location Note: When planning your schedule and registering for courses, you should verify where each course is offered because courses for this program are taught at both McGill's Downtown campus and at the Macdonald campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue.

Core: Required Courses (18 credits)

Location Note: Core required courses are taught at both McGill's Downtown campus and at the Macdonald campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. You should register in Section 001 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Downtown campus, and in Section 051 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Macdonald campus.

  • ENVR 200 The Global Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : A systems approach to study the different components of the environment involved in global climate change: the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. The interactions among these components. Their role in global climate change. The human dimension to global change.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Anthony Ricciardi, Eyad Hashem Atallah, Katherine Pagnucco, Frederic Fabry, George McCourt (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 201 Society, Environment and Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : This course deals with how scientific-technological, socio-economic, political-institutional and behavioural factors mediate society-environment interactions. Issues discussed include population and resources; consumption, impacts and institutions; integrating environmental values in societal decision-making; and the challenges associated with, and strategies for, promoting sustainability. Case studies in various sectors and contexts are used.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Madhav Govind Badami, Kevin Manaugh, Christopher Barrington-Leigh, Nicolas Kosoy, Geoffrey Garver (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 202 The Evolving Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Formation of the Earth and the evolution of life. How geological and biological change are the consequence of history, chance, and necessity acting over different scales of space and time. General principles governing the formation of modern landscapes and biotas. Effects of human activities on natural systems.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Brian Leung, Kim Lisa Valenta, Don Baker, George McCourt, Sylvie de Blois, Katherine Pagnucco (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 203 Knowledge, Ethics and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Introduction to cultural perspectives on the environment: the influence of culture and cognition on perceptions of the natural world; conflicts in orders of knowledge (models, taxonomies, paradigms, theories, cosmologies), ethics (moral values, frameworks, dilemmas), and law (formal and customary, rights and obligations) regarding political dimensions of critical environments, resource use, and technologies.

    Terms: Fall 2016, Winter 2017

    Instructors: Julia Freeman, Gregory Matthew Mikkelson (Fall) Jaye Dana Ellis, Julia Freeman, Daviken Studnicki-Gizbert (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 301 Environmental Research Design (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Techniques used in design and completion of environmental research projects. Problem definition, data sources and use of appropriate strategies and methodologies. Principles underlying research design are emphasized, including critical thinking, recognizing causal relationships, ideologies and bias in research, and when and where to seek expertise.

    Terms: Fall 2016, Winter 2017

    Instructors: Ismael Vaccaro, Raja Sengupta, Colin Austin Chapman (Fall) Ismael Vaccaro, Raja Sengupta, Colin Austin Chapman (Winter)

    • Fall-Downtown Campus: Section 001

    • Winter-Downtown Campus: Section 001; Macdonald Campus: Section 051

    • Restrictions: Restricted to U2 or higher

  • ENVR 400 Environmental Thought (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in interdisciplinary seminar groups on challenging philosophical, ethical, scientific and practical issues. They will explore cutting-edge ideas and grapple with the reconciliation of environmental imperatives and social, political and economic pragmatics. Activities include meeting practitioners, attending guest lectures, following directed readings, and organizing, leading and participating in seminars.

    Terms: Fall 2016, Winter 2017

    Instructors: Nicolas Kosoy (Fall) Iwao Hirose, Julia Freeman, Jaye Dana Ellis (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

    • Prerequisite: ENVR 203

    • Restriction: Open only to U3 students, or permission of instructor

Core: Complementary Course - Senior Research Project (3 credits)

Only 3 credits will be applied to the program; extra credits will count as electives.

  • AGRI 519 Sustainable Development Plans (6 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Geared for solving real-world environmental problems related to water at the local, regional and international scale in Barbados. Projects to be designed by instructors in consultation with university, government and NGO partners and to be conducted by teams of 2 to 4 students in collaboration with them.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 519 or URBP 519.

  • ENVR 401 Environmental Research (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in an interdisciplinary team on a real-world research project involving problem definition, methodology development, social, ethical and environmental impact assessment, execution of the study, and dissemination of results to the research community and to the people affected. Teams begin defining their projects during the preceding spring.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: George McCourt, Julia Freeman, Gregory Matthew Mikkelson (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite: ENVR 301

    • Restriction: B.A. Faculty Program in Environment, B.A.&Sc. Faculty Program in Environment , B.Sc.(Ag.Env.Sc.) and B.Sc. Major in Environment, and Diploma in Environment.

  • ENVR 451 Research in Panama (6 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Research projects will be developed by instructors in consultation with Panamanian universities, government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Project groups will consist of four to six students working with a Panamanian institution. Topics will be relevant to Panama: e.g., protection of the Canal watershed, economical alternatives to deforestation, etc.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Restriction: students in the Panama Field Semester program. Offered in Panama only

Domain: Required Courses (21 credits)

  • ECON 230D1 Microeconomic Theory (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : The introductory course for Economics Major students in microeconomic theory. In depth and critical presentation of the theory of consumer behaviour, theory of production and cost curves, theory of the firm, theory of distribution, welfare economics and the theory of general equilibrium.

    Terms: Fall 2016, Winter 2017

    Instructors: Ling Ling Zhang, Irakli Japaridze (Fall)

  • ECON 230D2 Microeconomic Theory (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : See ECON 230D1 for course description.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Hassan Benchekroun (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: ECON 230D1

    • No credit will be given for this course unless both ECON 230D1 and ECON 230D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms

  • ECON 405 Natural Resource Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Topics include: Malthusian and Ricardian Scarcity; optimal depletion of renewable and non-renewable resources; exploration, risk and industry structure, and current resources, rent and taxation. Current public policies applied to the resource industries, particularly those of a regulatory nature.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Robert D Cairns (Winter)

  • EPSC 210 Introductory Mineralogy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Elementary crystallography, chemistry and identification of the principal rock-forming and ore minerals, in hand specimens and using optical microscopy. Demonstrations of other techniques applied to the identification of minerals and to the analysis of their composition and structure. Optional 2-day field trip.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Jeanne Paquette (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lectures, 3 hours laboratory

    • Prerequisite(s): CHEM 110 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

    • A nominal fee is charged to cover expenses of materials and supplies for identification kits (pen magnet, streak plate, hand lens and acid bottle) used to identify minerals during laboratory exercises.

    • Des frais seront prelevés pour couvrir l'usage des collections d'enseignement et les accessoires (loupe, aimant, bouteille d'acide chlorhydrique dilué, plaque de porcelaine) essentiels à l'identification des minéraux pendant les travaux pratiques.

  • EPSC 212 Introductory Petrology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : A survey of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks and the processes responsible for their formation. The laboratory will emphasize the recognition of rocks in both hand-specimen and thin section using optical microscopes.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Kim Berlo (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 hours lectures, 3 hours laboratory

    • Prerequisite: EPSC 210

  • EPSC 220 Principles of Geochemistry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Basic concepts in geochemistry and the application of geochemical principles of chemistry to geological subdisciplines. Particular emphasis on origin of elements, controls on their distribution in Earth and cosmos, isotopes, organic geochemistry and water chemistry. Application of phase diagrams to geology.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Don Baker (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory

  • EPSC 355 Sedimentary Geology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : The origin, classification, diagenesis and economic importance of sedimentary rocks. The physical properties of sedimentary rocks, the processes by which sediments are transported and deposited, and the environments in which they accumulate. Introduction to techniques for describing and analyzing sedimentary rocks in thin section, hand specimen, and on the outcrop.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Galen Halverson (Fall)

Domain: Complementary Courses (24 credits)

24 credits of complementary courses are selected as follows:

3 credits - Statistics courses
9 credits - List A
12 credits - List B

Statistics:

One of the following Statistics courses or equivalent.

Note: Credit given for Statistics courses is subject to certain restrictions. Students in Science should consult the "Course Overlap" information in the "Course Requirements" section for the Faculty of Science.

  • AEMA 310 Statistical Methods 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Mathematics (Agric&Envir Sci) : Measures of central tendency and dispersion; binomial and Poisson distributions; normal, chi-square, Student's t and Fisher-Snedecor F distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing; simple linear regression and correlation; analysis of variance for simple experimental designs.

    Terms: Fall 2016, Winter 2017

    Instructors: Pierre R L Dutilleul, Valérie Gravel (Fall) Pierre R L Dutilleul, Valérie Gravel (Winter)

    • Two 1.5-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab

    • Please note that credit will be given for only one introductory statistics course. Consult your academic advisor.

  • GEOG 202 Statistics and Spatial Analysis (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Exploratory data analysis, univariate descriptive and inferential statistics, non-parametric statistics, correlation and simple regression. Problems associated with analysing spatial data such as the 'modifiable areal unit problem' and spatial autocorrelation. Statistics measuring spatial pattern in point, line and polygon data.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Lea Berrang Ford (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2.5 hours and lab

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

  • MATH 203 Principles of Statistics 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Examples of statistical data and the use of graphical means to summarize the data. Basic distributions arising in the natural and behavioural sciences. The logical meaning of a test of significance and a confidence interval. Tests of significance and confidence intervals in the one and two sample setting (means, variances and proportions).

    Terms: Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Summer 2017

    Instructors: Russell Steele, Juliana Schulz (Fall) Yi Yang (Winter) Jose Andres Correa (Summer)

    • No calculus prerequisites

    • Restriction: This course is intended for students in all disciplines. For extensive course restrictions covering statistics courses see Section 3.6.1 of the Arts and of the Science sections of the calendar regarding course overlaps.

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar. Students should consult http://www.mcgill.ca/students/transfercredit for information regarding transfer credits for this course.

List A:

9 credits from:

  • AGEC 333 Resource Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The role of resources in the environment, use of resources, and management of economic resources within the firm or organization. Problem-solving, case studies involving private and public decision-making in organizations are utilized.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Laurence B B Baker (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or equivalent

  • ECON 326 Ecological Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Macroeconomic and structural aspects of the ecological crisis. A course in which subjects discussed include the conflict between economic growth and the laws of thermodynamics; the search for alternative economic indicators; the fossil fuels crisis; and "green'' fiscal policy.

    Terms: Fall 2016, Winter 2017

    Instructors: Robin Thomas Naylor (Fall) Robin Thomas Naylor (Winter)

  • ECON 347 Economics of Climate Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : The course focuses on the economic implications of, and problems posed by, predictions of global warming due to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Attention is given to economic policies such as carbon taxes and tradeable emission permits and to the problems of displacing fossil fuels with new energy technologies.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 and ECON 209 or those listed under Prerequisites above

  • ECON 416 Topics in Economic Development 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : This course gives students a broad overview of the economics of developing countries. The course covers micro and macro topics, with particular emphasis on the economic analysis at the micro level.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Francesco Amodio (Fall)

  • ECON 525 Project Analysis (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A course in cost benefit analysis for graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Robert D Cairns (Fall)

    • Restriction: Open to advanced undergraduate students. Prerequisite: ECON 250, ECON 352 or equivalent

  • ENVB 437 Assessing Environmental Impact (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Theories and procedures of assessing environmental impact. An examination of the environmental impact of existing programs and projects to examine their accuracy in predicting consequences and attenuating undesirable effects.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Gordon Hickey (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 lectures

    • Restrictions: U2 students and above. Not open to students who have taken WILD 437 or NRSC 437.

  • ENVR 422 Montreal Urban Sustainability Analysis (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Applied and experience-based learning opportunities are employed to critically assess Montreal as a sustainable city through research, discussion, and field trips. The urban environment is considered through various specific dimensions, ranging from: waste, energy, urban agriculture, green spaces and design, or transportation.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Prerequisite(s): ENVR 301 or equivalent, or permission from the instructor.

    • Corequisite(s): ENVR 421

List B:

12 credits from:

  • AGRI 435 Soil and Water Quality Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Management of soil and water systems for sustainability. Cause of soil degradation, surface and groundwater contamination by agricultural chemicals and toxic pollutants. Human health and safety concerns. Water-table management. Soil and water conservation techniques will be examined with an emphasis on methods of prediction and best management practices.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • This course carries an additional charge of $30.45 to cover the cost of transportation with respect to a field trip. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

  • ANTH 339 Ecological Anthropology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Intensive study of theories and cases in ecological anthropology. Theories are examined and tested through comparative case-study analysis. Cultural constructions of "nature" and "environment" are compared and analyzed. Systems of resource management and conflicts over the use of resources are studied in depth.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Colin H Scott (Winter)

  • BIOL 305 Animal Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The characteristics of the major groups of animals, their ancestry, history and relationship to one another. The processes of speciation, adaptive radiation and extinction responsible for diversity. Methods for constructing of phylogenies, for comparing phenotypes, and for estimating and analyzing diversity.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Rowan Barrett, Hans Carl Larsson, David M Green, Graham Bell (Winter)

  • BIOL 553 Neotropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Ecology revisited in view of tropical conditions. Exploring species richness. Sampling and measuring biodiversity. Conservation status of ecosystems, communities and species. Indigenous knowledge.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Catherine Potvin (Winter)

  • ECON 305 Industrial Organization (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : The course analyzes the structure, conduct, and performance of industries, particularly but not exclusively in Canada. Topics include effects of mergers, barriers to entry, product line and promotion policies, vertical integration, and R & D policies of firms.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Laura Lasio (Fall)

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 and ECON 209 or those listed under Prerequisites above

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ECON 305

  • ECON 313 Economic Development 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Microeconomic theories of economic development and empirical evidence on population, labour, firms, poverty. Inequality and environment.

    Terms: Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Summer 2017

    Instructors: Matthieu Chemin, Diego Pulido Lema (Fall) Matthieu Chemin (Winter) Nagham Sayour (Summer)

    • Prerequisite: ECON 208 and either ECON 209 or one development course.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken 154-313D.

  • ECON 314 Economic Development 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Macroeconomic development issues, including theories of growth, public finance, debt, currency crises, corruption, structural adjustment, democracy and global economic organization.

    Terms: Fall 2016, Winter 2017

    Instructors: John C Kurien (Fall) John C Kurien, Maxwell Tuuli (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: ECON 313

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken 154-313D

  • ECON 408 Public Sector Economics 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Theoretical and empirical economic analysis of the public sector with an emphasis on public goods and government spending. Study of Canadian institutions in international perspective.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Ling Ling Zhang (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: ECON 230D1/D2 or 250D1/D2 or permission of the instructor.

    • Not open to students who have already completed ECON 408D1/D2.

  • ECON 409 Public Sector Economics 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Theoretical and empirical economic analysis of the public sector with an emphasis on taxation. Study of Canadian institutions in international perspective.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Ling Ling Zhang (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: ECON 408 or permission of the instructor

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ECON 408D1/D2

  • ENVR 421 Montreal: Environmental History and Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : This course will focus on the role of place and history in the cities in which we live and in our understanding of sustainability. Each year, students will work to develop a historical reconstruction of the natural environment of Montreal and of its links to the cultural landscape, building on the work of previous cohorts of students.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Each year focuses on making a specific and unique contribution to The Hochelaga Project; topics vary as required.

    • Prerequisite(s): ENVR 301 or equivalent, or permission from the instructor.

    • Corequisite(s): ENVR 422

  • EPSC 240 Geology in the Field (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Lectures and field-based exercises, held locally on campus and in the Montreal area, introduce students to the reading and interpretation of a topographic map, the basic description of a stratigraphic section and the inference of its depositional environment, the nature of intrusive contacts, and the field measurement of some structural features and geophysical properties. Students plot geological information on a map, identify landforms in aerial views and learn the tectonic features diagnostic of plate margins. By the end of the course, the students relate a geological map to the geological history of Quebec.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Christen Danielle Rowe (Fall)

    • Corequisite(s): EPSC 233 or EPSC 201

    • Restriction(s): Open to first-year Major and Honours students in Earth and Planetary Sciences.

    • Students from other programs must obtain permission of the instructor.

  • EPSC 331 Field School 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Two week field studies in selected branches of the geosciences.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Two-week intensive field school to a range of national and international locations.

    • Prerequisites: EPSC 240, enrolment in U2 or U3 EPS program, and permission of the instructor.

    • Alternates years with EPSC 341.

    • The field school will be based around the Bay of Fundy, and central Nova Scotia and has an additional fee of $563.27 to cover the costs of transportation and accommodation as well as other field expenses. Six days will be spent around the Chignecto peninsula, including visits to Parrsboro, Joggins, and Cape Chignecto park. The remaining time will be spent between Pictou, Wolfville and the Annapolis valley, and the coast south of Halifax.

  • EPSC 341 Field School 3 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Two week field studies in selected branches of the geosciences to examine processes in geology.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Two week intensive field school to a range of national and international locations.

    • Prerequisites: EPSC 240, enrolment in U2 or U3 EPS program and permission of the instructor.

    • Alternates years with EPSC 331.

    • This course, given every alternate year, has an additional fee of $563.27 to cover the costs of airfare, meals and accommodation as well as other field expenses. The fee is only refundable prior to the deadline to withdraw with full refund. The department of Earth and Planetary Science subsidizes a portion of the cost for this activity.

  • EPSC 425 Sediments to Sequences (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Advanced techniques for interrogating the stratigraphic record. Topics include cyclicity in the sedimentary record, sequence stratigraphy, chemostratigraphy, sedimentary control on the fossil record, and the record of deep sea sediment cores.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Winter

    • 2 hours lectures, 3 hours laboratory

    • Prerequisites: EPSC 355 or ESYS 300 or permission of instructor.

  • EPSC 435 Applied Geophysics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Methods in geophysical surveying including gravity, magnetism, electromagnetism, resistivity and seismology; application to exploration and near surface environmental and hydrological targets are included, along with field applications of techniques.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Fall

    • Prerequisites: EPSC 231 or EPSC 320, or permission of instructor

    • 3 hours lectures

    • 2 hours lectures, 3 hours laboratory

    • The field component of the course will be held in all weather conditions. Appropriate clothing is required by the students.

  • EPSC 452 Mineral Deposits (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : A systematic review of the nature and origin of the major types of metallic and non-metallic mineral deposits; typical occurrences; geographic distribution; applications to exploration. Emphasis on magmatic ores, massive sulfides, iron formations.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Anthony E Williams-Jones (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lectures, 3 hours laboratory

    • Prerequisite: EPSC 220, enrolment in U2 or U3 EPS program

  • EPSC 519 Isotope Geology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Geochronology, the fractionation of the stable isotopes, and applications to petrology and mineral deposits.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lectures

    • Prerequisites: equivalent of the U2 core program.

  • EPSC 542 Chemical Oceanography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : History of chemical oceanography. Seawater composition and definition of salinity/chlorinity. Minor and trace-element distribution in the ocean. Geochemical mass balance. Dissolved gases in sea water. CO2 and the carbonate system. Chemical speciation. Physical chemistry of seawater. Organic matter and the carbon cycle in the marine environment. Sediment geochemistry.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lectures

    • Prerequisites: CHEM 213, CHEM 257 or equivalents, or registration in the Graduate Program in Oceanography.

  • EPSC 549 Hydrogeology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Introduction to groundwater flow through porous media. Notions of fluid potential and hydraulic head. Darcy flux and Darcy's Law. Physical properties of porous media and their measurement. Equation of groundwater flow. Flow systems. Hydraulics of pumping and recharging wells. Notions of hydrology. Groundwater quality and contamination. Physical processes of contaminant transport.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Jeffrey McKenzie (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lectures, 1-2 hours laboratory

    • Prerequisite: permission of the instructor

  • EPSC 580 Aqueous Geochemistry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : The use of chemical thermodynamics to study fluid-rock interactions with an emphasis on the aqueous phase. The course will introduce basic concepts and will discuss aqueous complexation, mineral surface adsorption, and other controls on crustal fluid compositions. Applications will range from considering contaminated groundwater systems to metamorphic reactions.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Alfonso Mucci (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lectures

    • Prerequisites: EPSC 210, EPSC 212, or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

  • EPSC 590 Applied Geochemistry Seminar (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Seminar course devoted to field case studies that illustrate the applications of geochemical principles to solving geologic problems. Each student will prepare and lead a class devoted to a geochemical subject of their own choosing.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Anthony E Williams-Jones, Alfonso Mucci (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours seminar

    • Prerequisite: permission of instructor

  • GEOG 302 Environmental Management 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An ecological analysis of the physical and biotic components of natural resource systems. Emphasis on scientific, technological and institutional aspects of environmental management. Study of the use of biological resources and of the impact of individual processes.

    Terms: Fall 2016

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Fall)

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: Any 200-level course in Geography or MSE or BIOL 308 or permission of instructor.

  • GEOG 322 Environmental Hydrology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Quantitative, experimental study of the principles governing the movement of water at or near the Earth's surface and how the research relates to the chemistry and biology of ecosystems.

    Terms: Winter 2017

    Instructors: Nigel Thomas Roulet, Bernhard Lehner (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or equivalent

  • SOIL 510 Environmental Soil Chemistry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Soil Science : Soil chemical principles are presented in a series of problem sets covering basic concepts as well as applications to environmental and agricultural situations.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2016-2017 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: A course in Soil Science or permission of instructor

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken SOIL 410.

Faculty of Science—2016-2017 (last updated Aug. 26, 2016) (disclaimer)