Integrated Studies in Education

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Integrated Studies in Education

Location

Location

  • Department of Integrated Studies in Education
  • Education Building, Room 244
  • 3700 McTavish Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 1Y2
  • Canada
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/dise
  • Graduate Programs (Graduate Certificate, M.A., MATL, and Ph.D.):
  • Education Building, Room 244
  • Telephone: 514-398-4527 (Ph.D./M.A.: ext. 09133; MATL/Graduate Certificates: ext. 094476)
  • Fax: 514-398-4529

The administrative office is open Monday to Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

About Integrated Studies in Education

About Integrated Studies in Education

The Department offers graduate students the opportunity to enhance their knowledge related to specific areas of inquiry in the field of education through our M.A. degrees (thesis or non-thesis options), including our MATL leading to teacher certification, Ph.D. in Educational Studies, and graduate certificates. The Department offers the following programs:

Five Graduate Certificates (15 credits):

  • Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 1
  • Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 2
  • Graduate Certificate in International Leadership in Educational and Administrative Development
  • Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language
  • Certificat d’études supérieures en pédagogie de l’immersion française

Three M.A. Thesis and Non-Thesis degree programs (45 credits) in the following areas:

  • Education and Society
  • Educational Leadership
  • Second Language Education

The Department offers an M.A. in Teaching and Learning (MATL) (60 credits) in the following areas:

  • Social Sciences
  • English Language Arts
  • Science and Technology
  • Mathematics
  • English or French Second Language
    Note: The French Second Language program is currently not offered.

The Department also offers a Ph.D. in Educational Studies.

Master of Arts in Education and Society

The M.A. in Education and Society consists of a thesis or non-thesis program. The program focuses on two main fields of study—Culture and Values in Education and Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum—reflecting distinct but overlapping areas of educational inquiry. Study in Culture and Values in Education may focus on critical theory, philosophy, art and aesthetics, race/class/gender issues in education, or international and comparative education. The Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum focus emphasizes current perspectives on pedagogy and curriculum, teacher education, in-and-out-of-school learning, practitioner research, and classroom practice. The program brings to bear diverse applied theoretical perspectives, including philosophy, sociology, cultural studies, policy studies, gender studies, critical pedagogy, and multi-literacies. Graduates of the program go on to doctoral programs or work in education and non-profit settings. Many in-service teachers take this program for professional development.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. thesis option is a research-oriented degree in which approximately half of the program consists of thesis research. The balance of the program is course work.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn credits of approved course work focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the M.A. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Thesis): Mathematics and Science Education (45 credits)

This M.A. concentration emphasizes research in mathematics and science education, including a specific focus on teacher education in the area of math and science. Graduates will gain sufficient research experience to conduct empirical research in math and science education and sufficient teacher education experience to assume roles as teacher educators in university or other settings. The program includes targeted opportunities for candidates to develop skills, knowledge, and practices specific to teaching and learning mathematics and science, mathematics and science teacher preparation, and research in both of these areas.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. non-thesis option consists mostly of course work, but includes two projects. This option is suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a research and theoretical orientation. The projects create an opportunity to investigate a particular interest.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Course Work (45 credits)

The M.A. non-thesis option, consisting entirely of course work, is less research-oriented and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Course Work Math & Science Education (45 credits)

This M.A. concentration emphasizes inquiry in mathematics and science education, including a specific focus on teacher education in the area of math and science. The program will include targeted opportunities for candidates to develop skills, knowledge and practices specific to teaching and learning mathematics and science, mathematics and science teacher preparation, and understanding research in both of these areas. The M.A. concentration will produce graduates who view improving mathematics and science education from a teaching and learning perspective, have developed understanding of the value of research in math and science education, and sufficient teacher education experience to assume roles as educational leaders in informal and formal settings.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn credits of approved course work focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The M.A. non-thesis project option consists mainly of course work and includes two projects. This option is suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a research and theoretical orientation. The projects create an opportunity for students to investigate a particular interest.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Jewish Education (45 credits)

This program is designed to offer a graduate-level point of entry into the teaching profession for students who typically will have completed a B.A. with a minor or major in Jewish Studies. The M.A. will not provide Quebec Ministry of Education teacher certification (in Quebec, certification is at the B.Ed. level), but at the present time, Jewish schools may hire non-certified teachers of Jewish Studies at their discretion.

Students interested in doing a research-focused M.A. in the area of Jewish education should follow one of the other graduate degree offerings within the area of Education and Society.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Project Math & Science Education (45 credits)

This M.A. concentration emphasizes research in mathematics and science education, including a specific focus on teacher education in the area of math and science. Graduates will gain sufficient research experience to conduct empirical research in math and science education and sufficient teacher education experience to assume roles as teacher educators in university or other settings. The program includes targeted opportunities for candidates to develop skills, knowledge, and practices specific to teaching and learning mathematics and science, mathematics and science teacher preparation, and research in both of these areas.

Master of Arts in Educational Leadership

The M.A. in Educational Leadership consists of a thesis or non-thesis program. This program is designed to prepare leaders in the field of education, and in other centres of formal or informal learning, who are committed to personal and institutional improvement. The program fosters the ongoing development of reflective practitioners who have a sense of educational action, the capacity to anticipate needs, the ability to exercise professional judgment within the realities of policy frameworks, and the ability to both lead and support institutional and organizational change at all levels. A central theme of the program is the impact of policy on educational practice at local, national, and international levels.

Local and international students are practising and aspiring school principals and leaders from other organizations. Graduates fulfil Quebec Ministry requirements for school leadership and find positions as school leaders, as well as opportunities in other managerial settings.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Educational Leadership (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. thesis option is a research-oriented degree in which approximately half of the program consists of thesis research. The balance of the program is course work.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Educational Leadership (Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn credits of approved course work focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the M.A. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis): Course Work (45 credits)

The M.A. non-thesis option, consisting entirely of course work, is less research-oriented and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis): Project (45 credits)

The M.A. non-thesis option – Project consists of both course work and a project. It is less research-oriented than the thesis option and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn credits of approved course work focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the project must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.

Master of Arts in Second Language Education

The M.A. in Second Language Education consists of a thesis or non-thesis program. It provides an overview of the state of the art in second-language acquisition, assessment and evaluation, and research methods, including quantitative and qualitative approaches. The program covers a wide range of current topics in applied linguistics and offers opportunities to specialize in educational sociolinguistics, curricular/methods and program planning areas (for example, content-based second-language teaching or “immersion”), language testing, language policy and planning, and critical applied linguistics. Graduates may go on to doctoral work in applied linguistics. They may also seek employment at ministry, school board, or other sites of active research on second languages. Many graduates also continue active careers in school contexts as second-language teaching practitioners, program administrators, or evaluators.

From a range of pedagogical, linguistic, cognitive, political, and sociocultural perspectives, this program combines theoretical and applied studies of how second and foreign languages are learned and used.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Second Language Education (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. thesis option is a research-oriented degree in which approximately half of the program consists of thesis research. The balance of the program is course work.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Second Language Education (Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn credits of approved course work focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the M.A. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Second Language Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. non-thesis option, consisting entirely of course work, is less research-oriented and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.

Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning (MATL)

The M.A. in Teaching and Learning is a professional program leading to Quebec teacher certification for those already holding an undergraduate degree in a Quebec Ministry of Education-identified teachable subject area (Mathematics, Science & Technology, Social Sciences, English, TESL, TFSL). This degree program comprises course work coupled with an internship. Throughout the MATL, emphasis will be on the attainment of the QEP professional competencies, and evidence of mastery of these competencies must be demonstrated in order for students to successfully complete the program. Upon completion, students are recommended to the Quebec Ministry of Education for certification.

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): English or French Second Language (60 credits)

This program is comprised of course work, coupled with an internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the Quebec Ministry of Education for certification to teach English or French Second Language.

Note: The French Second Language program is currently not offered.
Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): English Language Arts Option (60 credits)

This program is comprised of course work, coupled with an internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the Quebec Ministry of Education for certification to teach English Language Arts.

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis):Mathematics Option (60 credits)

This program is comprised of course work, coupled with an internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the Quebec Ministry of Education for certification to teach Mathematics.

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): Social Sciences Option (60 credits)

This program is comprised of course work, coupled with an internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the Quebec Ministry of Education for certification to teach Social Sciences.

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): Science and Technology Option (60 credits)

This program is comprised of course work, coupled with an internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the Quebec Ministry of Education for certification to teach Science and Technology.

Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Studies

The Ph.D. in Educational Studies prepares graduates for careers in a variety of education-related fields. The Ph.D.’s core areas are curriculum and literacy, cultural and international studies in education, educational leadership, and second-language education. The program has been designed to ensure flexibility, and students experience both multidisciplinary and discipline-specific research opportunities. The program begins with a set of common courses and proceeds to specialization through advanced course work and dissertation topics focused on areas of expertise that are supported by the research interests of current faculty members. Graduates find work as researchers, teachers, consultants, curriculum developers, and administrators in a wide range of settings, including universities, school boards, government agencies, and international NGOs.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Educational Studies

The Ph.D. in Educational Studies provides an integrative perspective on education by drawing on a range of related disciplines and research orientations. Students develop scholarly and innovative expertise in at least one of three contexts of inquiry and awareness of all three:

  1. the broad context of culture and society;
  2. the international, national, and local contexts of educational leadership and policy studies; and
  3. the more specific contexts of schools and other sites of teaching and learning.

Students begin with a set of common core courses and proceed to specialization through advanced course work and dissertation topics focused on areas of expertise that are supported by the research interests of current faculty members.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Educational Studies: Gender and Women's Studies

The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved course work focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the Ph.D. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Educational Studies: Language Acquisition

Students must satisfy all program requirements for the Ph.D. in Educational Studies. The Ph.D. thesis must be on a topic relating to language acquisition, approved by the LAP committee.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Educational Studies: Mathematics and Science Education

This Ph.D. concentration emphasizes research in mathematics and science education, including a specific focus on teacher education in the area of math and science. Graduates will gain sufficient research experience to conduct empirical research in math and science education and sufficient teacher education experience to assume roles as teacher educators in university or other settings. The program includes targeted opportunities for candidates to develop skills, knowledge, and practices specific to teaching and learning mathematics and science, mathematics and science teacher preparation, and research in both of these areas. Applicants for the Ph.D. concentration in mathematics and science education would be expected to already have a Master's degree that included educational research.

Graduate Certificates

Graduate Certificate (Gr. Cert.) Educational Leadership 1 (15 credits)

This program addresses the needs of experienced and aspiring school leaders who are taking increased responsibility for the students and communities they serve. The management of schools is increasingly seen as making a major contribution to the learning and personal development of students. The professional development of school leaders, educational reform, and school partnership form the basis for the program. Course selection to be approved by Graduate Certificate Program Director.

Graduate Certificate (Gr. Cert.) Educational Leadership 2 (15 credits)

This program explores more deeply leadership theory and educational issues and applications in a practicum. Candidates for the Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 2 should normally have completed the first certificate. In combination, the two certificates allow school administrators to acquire the 30 graduate credits in the field of educational leadership required by the Quebec Ministry of Education. Course selection to be approved by Graduate Certificate Program Director.

No course taken in Certificate 1 can be repeated in Certificate 2.

Graduate Certificate (Gr. Cert.) International Leadership in Educational and Administrative Development (15 credits)

This program targets leaders, consultants, senior management and administrators, and policy makers from a range of educational institutions (universities, colleges, private schools) and organizations (hospitals, community, governmental), as well as the corporate sector. The goal is to provide a world-class professional learning experience in educational leadership. The majority of the courses will be delivered online, in combination with a two- to three-week intensive McGill campus component during the summer months. The online component of the certificate will facilitate full-time working schedules and provide greater flexibility in different international time zones. Lectures will be pre-recorded so students may view them to suit their own schedules. Students will have the capacity to communicate, discuss, and ask questions to one another and with the course lecturer through the online communication platform.

Please note that the fee schedule for this program is different from standard graduate programs. For information, please contact program administrator natalia.bessette [at] mcgill.ca (Natalia Bessette).

Graduate Certificate (Gr. Cert.) Teaching English as a Second Language (15 credits)

This program is designed as professional development for in-service teachers and candidates with a background in education, language studies, linguistics, or a related field, or as preparation for application to our M.A. in Second Language Education. The five courses that comprise the certificate provide a solid background and offer in-depth study in the field of second-language education from a range of perspectives and with a focus on research and applications to teaching. Please note that this certificate does not lead to teacher certification. The Graduate Certificate in TESL is designed to be available to students worldwide. Courses are offered in a combination of online and face-to-face formats, and are sequenced in such a way that students can complete the certificate in one year. The maximum time for completion is three years. The first three courses are offered online, and can be undertaken wherever an Internet connection is available. The final two courses are offered face-to-face in the Summer semester either on-site at McGill or at off-site locations with collaborative partners, if enrolment numbers warrant it.

Certificat d’études supérieures en pédagogie de l'immersion française (Cert.ed.sup.) pédagogie de l'immersion française (15 crs)

Le certificat d’études supérieures en pédagogie de l’immersion française vise à faire la formation des enseignants en immersion française tout en abordant les défis pédagogiques reliés à l'enseignement ciblé conjointement sur la langue et le contenu. Ce certificat est destiné à la formation aux enseignants des niveaux primaire et secondaire. À cette fin, il amène d'abord l'étudiant à comprendre les causes à la fois linguistiques et cognitives des difficultés qu'éprouvent les élèves en immersion. Il propose ensuite une variété de stratégies d'enseignement propices à répondre à ces difficultés et de situations d'apprentissage étayées par les enseignants de manière à dépasser le cloisonnement entre langue et contenu. Il comporte cinq cours obligatoires. La réussite d'un test de français est obligatoire lors de la demande d'admission.

Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2018-2019 (last updated Aug. 16, 2018) (disclaimer)

Integrated Studies in Education Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Integrated Studies in Education Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission Requirements

For specific program admission requirements and further information, please refer to www.mcgill.ca/dise/grad.

Graduate Certificates, M.A., and Ph.D. Programs

  1. Applicants to the Certificate and M.A. programs must hold a bachelor's degree from a recognized university. A minimum standing equivalent to a CGPA of 3.0/4.0, or 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years, is required. A concentration of courses related to the area chosen for graduate work is usually required. (See #5 below)

    Applicants to the Ph.D. program must hold an M.A. in Education or a recognized equivalent degree from a recognized university. The applicant's record should indicate high academic standing (a minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0) and evidence of research competence in the proposed area of doctoral research.

  2. Applicants to the Certificate and M.A. programs must submit:
    • a current curriculum vitae;
    • a letter of intent specifying academic and professional experience and interests (specifically, research interests for the Thesis option or project interests for the Non-Thesis Project option).

    Applicants to the Ph.D. in Educational Studies program must submit:

    • a current curriculum vitae;
    • a letter of intent identifying the applicant's proposed research topic, potential supervisor, and expected professional direction. Please note that it is the Ph.D. applicant's responsibility to secure a supervisor as part of the admission process;
    • a four- to five-page summary of the proposed research topic identifying the applicant's main research questions, the research trends that have led to the questions, ways in which the research could be conducted, and relevant references.
  3. Applicants must submit two letters of recommendation, at least one of which must be from a university-level instructor; the other may be from an administrator in an educationally relevant context.
  4. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must meet one of the following English proficiency criteria:
    • IELTS with a minimum overall band of 7.0 with a minimum writing score of 7.0; or
    • TOEFL iBT (Internet-based test) – minimum overall band of 92 with a minimum score of 22 each for the Writing and Speaking sections and a minimum of 20 each for the Reading and Listening sections.
    For applicants to the Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning (MATL) (Non-Thesis):
    • IELTS with minimum overall band of 7.0 with a minimum of 7.0 each for the Writing, Speaking, Listening, and Reading sections; or
    • TOEFL iBT (Internet-based test) – minimum overall band of 92 with a minimum score of 22 each for the Writing, Speaking, Listening, and Reading sections.

    The Department reserves the right to evaluate the applicant's language proficiency before initial registration.

  5. Further requirements applicable to specific options:

    Graduate Certificates in Educational Leadership 1 and 2 – Normally, applicants are required to have at least two years of relevant educational experience (in leadership roles or related professional experience).

    Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language – Applicants are required to pass a written and oral English language proficiency test set by the Department.

    Master of Arts in Second Language Education – Normally, applicants are required to have a minimum of 36 credits including a combination of relevant courses in education and language studies. Applicants are required to have at least two years of relevant professional experience in education.

    Master of Arts in Educational Leadership – Normally, applicants are required to have at least two years of relevant leadership experience (teaching or related professional experience).

    Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning (MATL) (Non-Thesis) – Please see the Departmental website for additional admission requirements. Applicants to the MATL TESL option are required to pass a written and oral English language proficiency test with a French component set by the Department. Applicants are required to have experience in educational settings (formal or informal).

    Certificat d’études supérieures en pédagogie de l’immersion française – Applicants are required to pass a written and oral French language proficiency test set by the Department.

Application Procedures

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See University Regulations & Resources > Graduate > Graduate Admissions and Application Procedures > Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal (for Ph.D. applicants)
  • Ph.D. applicants must secure a Thesis Supervisor as part of the application process.

Application Dates and Deadlines

Application Dates and Deadlines

Application opening dates are set by Enrolment Services in consultation with Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (GPS), while application deadlines are set by the Department of Integrated Studies in Education and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program or www.mcgill.ca/dise/grad.

M.A. Second Language Education, M.A. Educational Leadership, M.A. Education and Society, Graduate Certificate in International Leadership in Educational and Administrative Development
  Application Opening Dates Application Deadlines
  All Applicants Non-Canadian citizens (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Canadian citizens/Perm. residents of Canada (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Current McGill Students (any citizenship)
Fall Term: Sept. 15 Jan. 1 Jan. 1 Jan. 1
Winter Term: N/A N/A N/A N/A
Summer Term: N/A N/A N/A N/A
Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning (MATL)
  Application Opening Dates Application Deadlines
  All Applicants Non-Canadian citizens (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Canadian citizens/Perm. residents of Canada (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Current McGill Students (any citizenship)
Fall Term: N/A N/A N/A N/A
Winter Term: N/A N/A N/A N/A
Summer Term: May 15 Dec. 15 Jan. 15 Jan. 15
Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership
  Application Opening Dates Application Deadlines
  All Applicants Non-Canadian citizens (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Canadian citizens/Perm. residents of Canada (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Current McGill Students (any citizenship)
Fall Term: Sept. 15 March 1 March 1 March 1
Winter Term: Feb. 15 Sept. 10 Oct. 15 Oct. 15
Summer Term: N/A N/A N/A N/A
Certificat d'études supérieures en pédagogie de l’immersion française
  Application Opening Dates Application Deadlines
  All Applicants Non-Canadian citizens (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Canadian citizens/Perm. residents of Canada (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Current McGill Students (any citizenship)
Fall Term: Sept. 15 Feb. 1 June 15 June 15
Winter Term: Feb. 15 Sept. 10 Oct. 15 Oct. 15
Summer Term: N/A N/A N/A N/A
Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language
  Application Opening Dates Application Deadlines
  All Applicants Non-Canadian citizens (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Canadian citizens/Perm. residents of Canada (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Current McGill Students (any citizenship)
Fall Term: Sept. 15 Feb. 1 June 15 June 15
Winter Term: N/A N/A N/A N/A
Summer Term: N/A N/A N/A N/A
Ph.D. Educational Studies
  Application Opening Dates Application Deadlines
  All Applicants Non-Canadian citizens (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Canadian citizens/Perm. residents of Canada (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Current McGill Students (any citizenship)
Fall Term: Sept. 15 Dec. 1 Dec. 1 Dec. 1
Winter Term: N/A N/A N/A N/A
Summer Term: N/A N/A N/A N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2018-2019 (last updated Aug. 16, 2018) (disclaimer)

Integrated Studies in Education Faculty

Integrated Studies in Education Faculty

Chair
Steven Jordan
Director of Teacher Education Programs & Certificates, and M.A. Programs
Caroline Riches
Assistant Director of Undergraduate Programs
Sheryl Smith-Gilman
Director of First Nations and Inuit Education
James Howden
Director of Ph.D. Program
Marta Kobiela
Director of Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership, Assistant Director of M.A. Programs
Lisa Starr
Emeritus Professors
Patrick X. Dias; B.A., M.A.(Karachi), B.Ed., Ph.D.(Montr.)
David Dillon; B.A.(St. Columban's), M.S.(SW Texas St.), Ph.D.(Texas-Austin)
Margaret Gillett; B.A., Dip.Ed.(Syd.), M.A.(Russell Sage), Ed.D.(Col.) (William C. Macdonald Emeritus Professor of Education)
John B. Gradwell; B.A., M.A.(Calif.), Ph.D.(Iowa)
Denise Lussier; B.A.(Coll. Jesus Marie de Sillery), M.Ed.(Boston), M.A., Ph.D.(Laval) (Post-retirement)
Mary H. Maguire; B.A., B.Ed., M.A.(Montr.), M.Ed., Cert. Reading(McG.), Ph.D.(Ariz.)
Anthony Paré; B.Ed, M.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Jacques J. Rebuffot; B. ès L., L. ès L., D.E.S.(Aix-Marseilles), Dip. I.E.P., Dr. 3rd Cy.(Strasbourg)
Bernard Shapiro; B.A.(McG.), M.A.T., Ed.D.(Harv.)
David C. Smith; B.Ed.(McG.), Ph.D.(Lond.), F.C.C.T., F.R.S.A.
R. Lynn Studham; N.D.D.(Sunder), A.R.A.(Royal Acad., Copen.), M.A.(E. Carolina), C.S.G.A., S.C.A.
Lise Winer; B.A.(Pitt.), M.A.(Minn.), Cert. Ped.(C'dia), Ph.D.(West Indies)
John Wolforth; B.Sc.(Sheff.), M.A., Ph.D.(Br. Col.)
Professors
Lynn Butler-Kisber; B.Ed., M.Ed.(McG.), Ed.D.(Harv.)
Ratna Ghosh; C.M., B.A.(Calc.), M.A., Ph.D.(Calg.), F.R.S.C. (William C. Macdonald Professor of Education) (James McGill Professor)
Claudia A. Mitchell; B.A.(Bran.), M.A.(Mt. St. Vin.), Ph.D.(Alta.) (James McGill Professor)
Associate Professors
Anila Asghar; M.S.(Punjab), M.A.(Col.), M.Ed., Ed.D.(Harv.)
Fiona Benson; B.A.(Ott.), M. Ed., Ph.D.(McG.)
Eric Caplan; B.A.(Tor.), M.A.(Hebrew), Ph.D.(McG.)
Abdul Aziz Choudry; Grad.Dip., Ph.D.(C'dia)
Steven Jordan; B.A.(Kent), M.Sc.(Lond.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Bronwen Low; B.A.(Qu.), M.A.(Br. Col.), Ph.D.(York)
Kevin McDonough; B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed.(Alta.), Ph.D.(IlI.)
Caroline Riches; B.A., M.Sc.(Alta.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Mela Sarkar; B.A., Dip.Ed.(McG.), M.A., Ph.D.(C'dia)
Annie Savard; B.Ed., M.A., Ph.D.(Laval)
Shaheen Shariff; B.G.S., M.A.Educ., Ph.D.(S. Fraser)
Doreen Starke-Meyerring; B.Ed.(Potsdam), M.A.(N. Dakota), Ph.D.(Minn.)
Teresa Strong-Wilson; B.A.(Calg.), B.A.(McG.), M.A., Ph.D.(Vic., BC)
Georges Terroux; B.A.(Montr.), M.A.(Essex), Ph.D.(Montr.) (Post-retirement)
Boyd White; B.A.(Sir G. Wms.), B.F.A.(C'dia), M.F.A.(lnst. Allende, Guanajuato), Ph.D.(C'dia)
Elizabeth Wood; B.F.A.(York), B.F.A.(C'dia), Dip.Ed., M.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Assistant Professors
Susan Ballinger; B.A.(Wash.), M.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Mindy Carter; B.A.(Dal.), B.Ed.(Lake.), M.A.(C'dia), Ph.D.(Br. Col.)
Christian Ehret; B.A., M.A.(Georgia), Ph.D.(Vanderbilt)
Allison Gonsalves; B.Sc.(W.Ont.), M.Sc.(Guelph), Ph.D.(McG.)
Blane Harvey; B.A.(Ott.), M.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Philip Howard; B.A.(Cornell), Dip.Ed., M.A.(McG.), Ph.D.(OISE, Tor.)
Limin Jao; B.Sc., B.Ed.(Qu.), M.A., Ph.D.(OISE, Tor.)
Marta Kobiela; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Texas A & M), Ph.D.(Vanderbilt)
Joseph Levitan; B.A.(Brandeis), M.A.(Col.), Ph.D.(Penn. St.)
Naomi Nichols; B.A.(Trent), B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.(York)
Lisa Starr; B.Ed.(Regina), M.A.(Phoenix), Ph.D.(Vic., BC)
Paul Zanazanian; B.A., M.A.(McG.), Ph.D.(Montr.)
Faculty Lecturers
James Howden; B.Ed.(McG.), M.Ed.(OISE, Tor.)
Stephen Peters; B.Ed.(Alta.), M.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Sheryl Smith-Gilman; B.Ed., M.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Lisa Trimble; B.A.(W. Laur.), M.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Dawn Wiseman; B.Eng., Grad.Dip., M.A.(C'dia)
Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2018-2019 (last updated Aug. 16, 2018) (disclaimer)

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Thesis) (45 credits)

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Thesis): Mathematics and Science Education (45 credits)

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. non-thesis option consists mostly of coursework, and includes two 6 credit projects. This option is suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a research and theoretical orientation. The project creates an opportunity for students to investigate a particular interest.

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis) (45 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Course Work (45 credits)

The M.A. in Education and Society; Non-Thesis-Course Work program consists exclusively of course work. This option is less research-oriented than the thesis and non-thesis project options and is suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Course Work (45 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Course Work Math & Science Education (45 credits)

The M.A. in Education and Society; Non-Thesis-Course Work - Mathematics and Science Education program emphasizes a pedagogical understanding of mathematics and science education, including a specific focus on teacher education in the areas of mathematics and science. The program will include targeted opportunities for candidates to develop skills, knowledge and...

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Course Work Math & Science Education (45 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

The M.A. non-thesis project option - Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit and wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The non-thesis project option consists mainly of coursework, and...

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Jewish Education (45 credits)

This program is designed to offer a graduate-level point of entry into the teaching profession for students who typically will have completed a B.A. with minor or major in Jewish Studies. The M.A. will not provide Quebec Government teacher certification (in Quebec, certification is at the B.Ed. level), but at the present time, Jewish schools may hire non-certified...

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Jewish Education (45 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Project Math & Science Education (45 credits)

The M.A. in Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Project Mathematics and Science Education program emphasizes action-oriented research in mathematics and science education, with a specific focus on teacher education in the areas of mathematics and science. The program will include targeted opportunities for candidates to develop skills, knowledge, and practices...

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) Education and Society (Non-Thesis): Project Math & Science Education (45 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.) Educational Leadership (Thesis) (45 credits)

Master of Arts (M.A.) Educational Leadership (Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

Master of Arts (M.A.) Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis): Course Work (45 credits)

Master of Arts (M.A.) Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis): Project (45 credits)

Master of Arts (M.A.) Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

Master of Arts (M.A.) Second Language Education (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. in Second Language Education consists of a 45-credit thesis or non-thesis program. It provides an overview of the state of the art in second language acquisition, assessment and evaluation, and research methods, including quantitative and qualitative approaches. The program covers a wide range of current topics in applied linguistics and offers...

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) Second Language Education (Thesis) (45 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.) Second Language Education (Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

Master of Arts (M.A.) Second Language Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. in Second Language Education consists of a 45-credit thesis or non-thesis program. It provides an overview of the state of the art in second language acquisition, assessment and evaluation, and research methods, including quantitative and qualitative approaches. The program covers a wide range of current topics in applied linguistics and offers...

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) Second Language Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits).

Graduate Student Teaching / M.A. in Teaching and Learning Internship

Graduate Student Teaching / M.A. in Teaching and Learning Internship

The Internships & Student Affairs Office (ISA) in the Faculty of Education is responsible for the placement and evaluation of all MATL student teachers registered in the Internship courses (EDIN course code).

Internships

Internships

MATL Internships:

  • are required courses compliant with Ministry requirements and in accordance with the University–School Board agreements; organized and evaluated by the Faculty of Education's Internships & Student Affairs Office (ISA); student teachers are not permitted to contact potential host schools to obtain a placement (unless on paid contract; see below);
  • are completed with an eligible Cooperating Teacher(s) as mentor(s), unless a student teacher has received ISA approval to use a paid teaching contract at an eligible host school to satisfy the Internship requirements (see Placement Options below);
  • must be completed at the Secondary level within a public or private Anglophone school in the greater Montreal region, with the exception of the Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) program, in which student teachers are placed in Francophone public or private schools. Student teachers may only be placed in a private school setting for one of the two required Internships;
  • may exceptionally be completed in an adult education setting (Internship 2 only) or in a Francophone setting (Internship 2 only), with ISA’s authorization;
  • require that students follow registration and placement request procedures as stipulated by the ISA. Students who do not follow procedures may not be assigned to a host school in a given term;
  • may begin or end before or after the first/last day of lectures, and may continue during regularly scheduled University breaks;
  • are not remunerated for student teachers placed with a Cooperating Teacher(s);
  • require that student teachers be present in the host school on a full-time basis for the specified duration of the Internship (refer to dates on the www.mcgill.ca/isa/student-teaching/fedates);
  • require that student teachers budget time and money for travel to and from their assigned host school;
  • may not be completed in a host school where a student teacher has a family member working or attending;
  • have a corequisite Professional Seminar component (see Minerva for dates and times).

Registration

Registration

Students:

  • must take Internship 1 in the first Winter term of the program;
  • must be in Satisfactory academic standing and have met all prerequisite and corequisite course requirements;
  • registered for the Internship course will receive permission to access the online Student Teaching Placement Form at their official @mail.mcgill.ca email address; the Placement Form must be completed by the date indicated in the email for preferences to be registered;
  • may defer an Internship with a valid reason by taking an official Leave of Absence from the University; valid reasons for a Leave of Absence can be viewed at www.mcgill.ca/gps/students/registration/progress/leave-vacation. On a case-by-case basis, students may be allowed to defer an Internship and continue in coursework dependent upon approval by the Program Director;
  • should consult their MATL Program Coordinator or ISA Placement Coordinator for further assistance, if required.
Note: Minerva does not always prevent students from registering for courses which they should not take. It is each student's responsibility to be aware of prerequisites, corequisites, restrictions, and Faculty regulations.

Placement Options

Placement Options

Cooperating Teacher

Student teachers without an approved teaching contract will be placed by an ISA Placement Coordinator in the classroom of an eligible Cooperating Teacher(s) and must follow the host school's schedule on a full-time basis. Student teachers in this situation must not contact potential host schools for placements.

Contract

Student teachers who have secured a paid teaching contract in the appropriate Internship term may request to have this contract reviewed by the ISA to see if it will fulfill the Internship requirements relative to number of hours, context, subject area, etc.

Please note, student teachers who have already been placed with a Cooperating Teacher for their Internship and subsequently wish to accept a contract either before or during the Internship must register a request with the ISA; approval is at the discretion of the ISA Director.

Students who wish to have a contract evaluated must:

  • consult MATL guidelines to determine if the contract may be eligible to meet Internship requirements;
  • ensure that the contract is for a minimum 70% of a full-time teaching workload; 100% of actual teaching hours must be in the appropriate teachable subject area;
  • complete the full number of required hours—per Internship guidelines—which may necessitate an extension of the Internship dates;
  • submit a copy of the contract (or a detailed letter from the School Administrator/HR) confirming the teaching schedule and conditions to the ISA; any further modification of an approved contract must be approved by the ISA.

Internship Guidelines (Syllabus)

Internship Guidelines (Syllabus)

Detailed Internship guidelines and copies of evaluation forms for each Internship are posted on the ISA website. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the Internship objectives, evaluation criteria, and forms prior to the start of each Internship.

Student Responsibilities

Student Responsibilities

Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the policies and rules governing all aspects of Internship, including pedagogical and professional behaviour (available at www.mcgill.ca/isa) prior to the start of the Internship.

Students should not engage in any type of employment during the course of the Internship (with the exception of a teaching contract used to fulfill the Internship requirements) nor register for any additional/non-required course(s) which may interfere with the successful outcome of the Internship.

ISA relies on the goodwill of Cooperating Teachers and School Administrators to arrange placements. To that end, the ISA strives to maintain professional relationships established over time with partner schools. Student teachers in the MATL program are advised to be aware of the commitment they are making to their chosen career when beginning the Internship. All decisions and actions should reflect the ethics of the teaching profession and the highest standards of professionalism.

Attendance and Absences

Punctual attendance is required at the host school for the duration of the Internship (per the host school’s full-day schedule and not that of the Cooperating Teacher’s). Unexcused absences from the Internship and/or corequisite courses, including Professional Seminar, may result in exclusion from the corequisite course or removal from/failure in the Internship.

Excused absences include:

  • Illness: Student teachers may be absent for up to 2 days without supporting medical documentation; after 2 days, a student teacher must obtain a supporting medical note and the outcome of the Internship may be evaluated by the ISA Director, as necessary;
  • McGill Exam: Student teachers with a scheduled McGill exam may be absent from the host school on the appointed day; this provision does not cover non-McGill exams;
  • Religious Observation: Student teachers are permitted to be absent for religious holy days, as outlined in McGill’s Policy on holy days;
  • McGill Varsity Sporting Event(s): Student teachers are permitted to participate in a sporting event as a member of a McGill varsity team; student teachers must provide the ISA with supporting documentation from McGill Athletics & Recreation.

Days missed due to excused absence must be made up, generally, at the end of the Internship.

In the case of a foreseeable absence (e.g. religious observation, varsity sporting event, etc.), student teachers must advise the below noted parties before the start of the Internship or, if the Internship has already commenced, at least two weeks in advance. In the case of an unforeseeable absence (e.g. illness), student teachers must advise the below noted parties as soon as possible:

  • Host School Administrative Office
  • Co-operating Teacher(s)
  • McGill Field Supervisor
  • McGill ISA Placement Coordinator (by e-mail or by phone: 514-398-7046)

Absences for any other reason, including but not limited to marriage, family events, vacation, extracurricular activities, employment, or conflicting courses, are not permitted during the Internship. Students who may need to defer the Internship or rearrange their course schedule should contact their Program Coordinator.

For student teachers on a paid contract, in case of a conflict between the University’s attendance policies and that of the host school, please contact the ISA.

Judicial Record Verification

Quebec’s Education Act, section 261.0.2, grants school boards the right to verify the judicial record of any person regularly in contact with minor students, and this includes student teachers. Each school board or private school may have its own administrative procedures for verification. Students are responsible for complying any request for judicial record verification. Any student unable to obtain the required security clearance will not be permitted to undertake their Internship(s) and, consequently, will be withdrawn from the MATL program as the Internships are a mandatory requirement. Additional information about the judicial record verification process can be found on the www.mcgill.ca/isa/student-teaching/preparation.

Work Permit for International Students

In order to be in compliance with government regulations, international students (students who are not Permanent Residents or citizens of Canada) should hold a valid Internship/Co-op Work Permit issued by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) to complete their Internships. This permit is independent from the paid off-campus work permit which is included as part of the study permit and requires a separate application. For detailed instructions and assistance with the application, students should contact www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents.

Grading and Credit

Grading and Credit

Internships are graded according to the graduate grading scale (Grading and Grade Point Averages (GPA)).

For students admitted to the MATL program prior to Summer 2017:

  • A final grade is assigned for the Internship course (EDIN) based on a combination of their marks in the field work (Internship) and Professional Seminar components;
  • Grades are weighted as follows: Supervisor Summative (40%), Cooperating Teacher Summative (40%), Professional Seminar Grade (20%). In the case of the Summative Evaluations, which are marked on a 1–5 point scale across 12 Professional Competencies (5 being the highest possible mark), each mark out of 5 is assigned a corelating number out of 100 and an average is calculated to reach a final numerical grade out of 100; this is then converted to the corresponding letter grade;
  • Students must pass both the Internship and Professional Seminar components of the course individually in order to pass the Internship (EDIN) course as a whole.

For students admitted to the MATL program in Summer 2017 and beyond:

  • A final grade is assigned for the Internship course (EDIN) based on a combination of their marks in the field work (Internship) alone;
  • Grades are weighted as follows: Supervisor Summative (50%), Cooperating Teacher Summative (50%); on both Summatives, which are marked on a 1–5 point scale across 12 Professional Competencies (5 being the highest possible mark), each mark out of 5 is assigned a corelating number out of 100 and an average is calculated to reach a final numerical grade out of 100; this is then converted to the corresponding letter grade;
  • Students must pass both the Internship 1 (EDIN 610) and the Professional Seminar 1 course (EDPS 610) in order to proceed to Internship 2 (EDIN 620) and the Professional Seminar 2 course (EDPS 620).

The Failure Policy applies. Where a student is experiencing serious pedagogical or professional difficulties in an Internship, the ISA Director will review the case, including formal evaluations as well as written reports from the field, to render one of the following decisions:

  • If the student has demonstrated potential to successfully reach the required standards of the Internship, a grade of "F" may be assigned for the EDIN course with permission to repeat an Internship during the next term in which it is offered. Per the Graduate Studies policy, a subsequent Failure (F, J, KF, WF) in an Internship or any other course will require withdrawal from the MATL program (NB: if the student has already obtained one "F", the standard failure policy applies);
  • Assign a grade of "F" for the EDIN course and submit a request to Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies, asking that the student be withdrawn from the MATL program immediately (with relevant supporting documentation).

An MATL student may appeal any final outcome of an Internship course (EDIN) within 30 days of the posted grade by making a written application to the Faculty of Education – Student Affairs Committee (SAC) (isa.education [at] mcgill.ca). If the outcome of the SAC, once concluded, is not accepted by the student, a formal application may be made to the Associate Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies for Education.

Withdrawal from Internship

  • A request for withdrawal (with refund) from the Internship (EDIN course) for any reason must be done at least two weeks before the start of the Internship; the student teacher is responsible for registering this request with the ISA in writing by this deadline;
  • Students wishing to withdraw for any other reason, including illness, personal reasons, etc., from an Internship (EDIN course) less than two weeks before its start or after it is underway must register their request in writing to the ISA; based on the circumstances surrounding the request, the ISA Director will determine the final outcome of the Internship and Enrolment Services will determine eligibility for refund.

Early Dismissal from an Internship

At any time, student teachers may be removed from their Internship placement at the request of the host School Administrator and/or Cooperating Teacher, or at the request of the ISA Director. Students who are removed from an Internship placement will be informed of the reason for the early dismissal and will meet with the ISA Director.

Circumstances that could lead to early dismissal include, but are not limited to:

  • Prerequisite courses not successfully completed;
  • Exceeding the number of permissible unexcused absences for corequisite courses (consult the syllabus for each course);
  • Failure to pass a judicial record check, if required by the school or school board where the student is placed;
  • Unprofessional behaviour or behaviour that contravenes the Code of Ethics for Student Teachers;
  • Failure to make the improvements outlined on a Competency Improvement Plan (CIP) or Record of Early Concern (REC) by the date indicated.

In these cases, the final outcome for of the Internship (EDIN course) will be determined by the ISA Director.

Possible outcomes include:

  • Reassignment during the same term, subject to availability of placements;
  • W – Withdrawal (with or without refund, at the discretion of Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies);
  • F – At the discretion of the ISA Director, the student may be permitted to register for the Internship again during the next regularly scheduled term;
  • F – At the discretion of the ISA Director, with a request to Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies, asking for immediate removal (with relevant supporting documentation).

Code of Professional Conduct: Code of Ethics for Student Teachers

Code of Professional Conduct: Code of Ethics for Student Teachers

Preamble – A Student-Centred Perspective

  • Mandate

    A joint subcommittee consisting of members from two standing committees of the Faculty of Education (Faculty of Education Ethical Review Board and Student Standing) was created to develop a Code of Ethics for Student Teachers and to examine the ways in which this Code will be communicated to students, faculty members, and educational partners.

  • Goals and Rationale

    The interests of the two Standing Committees of the Faculty of Education in promoting appropriate ethical and professional conduct have led us to develop the following Code of Ethics for Student Teachers. This code seeks to respond to and address the following needs:

    1. The Code addresses the interdependent duties, rights, and responsibilities of student teachers, faculty members, and educational partners.
    2. By addressing common issues and needs, the Code seeks to articulate and make explicit ethical principles that transcend disciplinary boundaries. These principles reflect the fundamental values that are expressed in the duties, rights, and responsibilities of all involved in Teacher Education.
    3. The Code requires a reasonable flexibility in the implementation of common principles. It is designed to help those involved in Teacher Education, as a matter of sound ethical reasoning, to understand and respect the contexts in which they work and accommodate the needs of others.
    4. The Code seeks to encourage continued reflection and thoughtful response to ethical issues. It does not seek definitive answers to all ethical questions or situations. Rather, it seeks to outline the guiding principles to ethical conduct and to identify major issues that are essential to the development and implementation of this Code.
  • Context of an Ethics Framework for Student Teachers

    The principles and norms guiding ethical conduct are developed within an ever-evolving complex societal context, elements of which include the need for reflective action and ethical principles.

    Education is premised on a fundamental moral commitment to advance and construct knowledge and to ensure human understanding and respect for individual and collective well-being and integrity.

    The moral imperative of respect translates into the following ethical principles that assume a student-centred perspective as articulated in the Quebec Curriculum Reform and Competencies outlined for Teacher Education.

Academic Freedom and Responsibilities

Teachers enjoy, and should continue to enjoy, important freedoms and privileges. However, with freedoms come responsibilities and ethical challenges. This Code of Ethics is in keeping with the philosophy and spirit of the New Directions that are embedded in the document “Teacher Training: Orientations, Professional Competencies” (MEQ 2001) and the reflective practice literature.

The role of the teacher and the contexts of teaching have changed. Thus, new resources (knowledge, skills, attitudes) are required to practise the profession and to meet the challenges of teaching and learning in whatever contexts student teachers may find themselves, and to engage in professional development individually and with others.

Ethics and Law

“Teaching is governed by a legal and regulatory framework” (MEQ 2001, p. 120). The law affects and regulates the standards and norms of teaching behaviours in a variety of ways such as respecting privacy, confidentiality, intellectual property, and competence. Human rights legislation prohibits discrimination and recognizes equal treatment as fundamental to human dignity and well-being. Teachers should respect the spirit of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, particularly the sections dealing with life, liberty, and the security of the person, as well as those involving equality and discrimination and the Education Act that sets out the obligations and rights of teachers.

Guiding Ethical Principles

Ethical student teachers should respect the following guiding ethical principles:

  1. Respect for Human Dignity
    • Speaks and acts toward all students with respect and dignity; and deals judiciously with them at all times, always mindful of their individual rights and personal sensibilities.
    • Respects the dignity and responsibilities of cooperating teachers, peers, principals, parents, and other professionals or para-professionals within the school, school board, and community.
  2. Respect for Vulnerable Persons
    • Respects and recognizes ethical obligations toward vulnerable persons. This principle recognizes that students are in a vulnerable position and that student teachers are in a privileged relationship with students and their families and will always refrain from exploiting that relationship in any form or manner.
  3. Respect for Confidentiality and Privacy
    • Respects the confidential nature of all information related to students and their families and will share such information in an appropriate manner only with those directly concerned with their welfare.
    • Respects the confidential nature of all information related to all school personnel and will share such information in an appropriate manner.
  4. Respect for Justice
    • Respects and recognizes the right of individuals to be treated with fairness and equity and the importance of avoiding conflicts of interest.
  5. Respect for Safety of Students
    • Respects the right of individuals to expect that student teachers will engage in practices that aim to ensure the physical, psychological, and emotional safety of students.
  6. Respect for Existing Ethical Codes and Professional Standards
    • Respects the authority, roles, and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher, and agrees to adhere to the responsibilities and obligations for teachers as outlined in the Education Act, Faculty, and University handbooks as well as all local agreements by host school boards and schools.
  7. Balancing Harm and Benefits
    • Acknowledges that any potentially harmful practices (e.g., science labs and physical education activities) must be balanced with anticipated benefits and conducted in a prudent, informed manner.

Putting Principles into Practice: Venues for Communication

More than one principle may apply to a given case or situation. For meaningful and effective implementation of these principles, they must be widely communicated and applied in appropriate contexts.

Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2018-2019 (last updated Aug. 16, 2018) (disclaimer)

Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning – Regulations and Programs

Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning – Regulations and Programs

Time Commitment

Time Commitment

The M.A. in Teaching and Learning program is designed such that the program may be completed in five or six consecutive terms. In all cases, the program begins with mandatory courses in the Summer term. It is important to note the following:

Students should consult a Program Coordinator and program overviews for details. Full-time/part-time status may also affect financial aid arrangements; contact the Scholarships and Student (Financial) Aid Office for more information. See Categories of Students for information about full-time and part-time study.

English Language Requirement

English Language Requirement

The Quebec Ministry of Education requires that all students in teacher education programs demonstrate their proficiency in the language of instruction. To fulfil this obligation, M.A. in Teaching and Learning students are required to write the English Examination for Teacher Certification (EETC) in May of the first Summer term of the program. Students must pass the examination in the first Summer term and prior to Internship 1. Students who do not pass the EETC exam must meet with the Program Coordinator to determine an individual program trajectory. Note, failure of the EETC exam may compromise a student's ability to maintain full time status.

The examination is coordinated by an independent body, the Centre for the English Exam for Teacher Certification. Information is available on the CEETC website. McGill assists with the administration and scheduling of the examination. To write this examination, students must first register on Minerva for a section of EDTL 515 in the Summer term, then register with the Centre at www.ceetc.ca and pay a fee before writing the test.

Students who do not pass both sections of the examination the first time are expected to meet with their Program Coordinator to plan a course of action for English language proficiency improvement. Students are required to take the EETC again, and must successfully complete the section that was not passed. A fee is charged each time the examination is written. Students who have not completed both sections of the examination on their fourth attempt are required to withdraw from the program, and must consult with an Program Coordinator about readmission procedures.

Capstone Research Project (CRP)

Capstone Research Project (CRP)

The CRP is a research project whereby MATL students, as they complete their courses and Internships, identify an area of professional interest either in the broad landscape of teaching and learning or directly related to their subject specialty. The CRP is supported and developed throughout the MATL program in designated courses. The CRP is due and presented in the final Professional Seminar of the program. Guidelines are posted on the Department's website and the Internships & Student Affairs website.

Portfolio

Portfolio

All students in the M.A. Teaching and Learning program are required to prepare a professional portfolio by the time of their graduation. The portfolio is a component of the professional seminars that are integrated with each Internship. The finished professional portfolio is a requirement of the MATL program. Guidelines are posted on the Internships & Student Affairs website.

Progress Tracking Report

Progress Tracking Report

Students in the M.A. Teaching and Learning program will engage in graduate progress tracking using the reporting forms and timelines established by the department specific to the MATL program.

Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2018-2019 (last updated Aug. 16, 2018) (disclaimer)

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): English or French Second Language (60 credits)

**The French option of this program is currently not offered.** ...

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): English or French Second Language (60 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): English Language Arts Option (60 credits)

The M.A. in Teaching and Learning Program is a 60-credit, post-graduate degree leading to teacher certification. It is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits (minimum of 735 hours) of internship. This professional program leads to teacher certification to those already holding an undergraduate degree in a teachable subject area identified by...

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): English Language Arts Option (60 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis):Mathematics Option (60 credits)

The M.A. in Teaching and Learning Program is a 60-credit, post-graduate degree leading to teacher certification. It is comprised of 45 credits of coursework coupled with 15 credits (minimum of 735 hours) of internship. This professional program leads to teacher certification to those already holding an undergraduate degree in a teachable subject area identified by...

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis):Mathematics Option (60 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): Social Sciences Option (60 credits)

The M.A. in Teaching and Learning Program is a 60-credit, post-graduate degree leading to teacher certification. It is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits (minimum of 735 hours) of internship. This professional program leads to teacher certification to those already holding an undergraduate degree in a teachable subject area identified by...

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): Social Sciences Option (60 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): Science and Technology Option (60 credits)

The M.A. in Teaching and Learning Program is a 60-credit, post-graduate degree leading to teacher certification. It is comprised 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits (minimum of 735 hours) of internship. This professional program leads to teacher certification to those already holding an undergraduate degree in a teachable subject area identified by...

For more information, see Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning (Non-Thesis): Science and Technology Option (60 credits).

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Educational Studies

Students must satisfy all program requirements of the Ph.D.

For more information, see Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Educational Studies.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Educational Studies: Gender and Women's Studies

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Educational Studies: Language Acquisition

Students must satisfy all program requirements for the Ph.D. in Educational Studies. The Ph.D. thesis must be on a topic relating to language acquisition.

For more information, see Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Educational Studies: Language Acquisition.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Educational Studies: Mathematics and Science Education

This Ph.D. concentration emphasizes research in mathematics and science education, including a specific focus on teacher education in the area of math and science. Graduates will gain sufficient research experience to conduct empirical research in math and science education and sufficient teacher education experience to assume roles as teacher educators in...

For more information, see Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Educational Studies: Mathematics and Science Education.

Graduate Certificate (Gr. Cert.) Educational Leadership 1 (15 credits)

This 15-credit program addresses the needs of experienced and aspiring school leaders who are taking increased responsibility for the students and communities they serve. The management of schools is increasingly seen as making a major contribution to the learning and personal development of students. The professional development of school leaders, educational...

For more information, see Graduate Certificate (Gr. Cert.) Educational Leadership 1 (15 credits).

Graduate Certificate (Gr. Cert.) Educational Leadership 2 (15 credits)

This 15-credit program explores more deeply leadership theory and educational issues and applications in a practicum. Candidates for the Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 2 should normally have completed the first certificate. In combination, the two certificates allow school administrators to acquire the 30 graduate credits in the field of educational...

For more information, see Graduate Certificate (Gr. Cert.) Educational Leadership 2 (15 credits).

Graduate Certificate (Gr. Cert.) International Leadership in Educational and Administrative Development (15 credits)

Graduate Certificate (Gr. Cert.) Teaching English as a Second Language (15 credits)

This 15-credit certificate is designed as professional development for in-service teachers and candidates with a background in education, language studies, linguistics, or a related field, or as preparation for application to our M.A. in Second Language Education. The five courses that comprise the certificate provide a solid background and offer in-depth study in...

For more information, see Graduate Certificate (Gr. Cert.) Teaching English as a Second Language (15 credits).

Certificat d’études supérieures en pédagogie de l'immersion française (Cert.ed.sup.) pédagogie de l'immersion française (15 crs)

Le certificat d’études supérieures en pédagogie de l'immersion française vise à faire la formation des enseignants en immersion française, tout en abordant les défis pédagogiques reliés à l’enseignement ciblant conjointement la langue et le contenu. Ce certificat d’études supérieures est destiné à la formation des enseignants des niveaux primaire et secondaire. A...

For more information, see Certificat d’études supérieures en pédagogie de l'immersion française (Cert.ed.sup.) pédagogie de l'immersion française (15 crs).

Faculty of Education—2018-2019 (last updated Aug. 16, 2018) (disclaimer)