Minor Ecological Agriculture (24 credits)

Offered by: Agricultural Economics     Degree: Bachelor of Science (Agricultural and Environmental Sciences)

Program Requirements

The Minor Ecological Agriculture is designed to focus on the principles underlying the practice of ecological agriculture and is suitable for students wishing to farm and do extension and government work, and those intending to pursue postgraduate studies in this field.

This Minor can be associated with existing major programs in the Faculty, but in some instances it may require more than 90 credits to meet the requirements of both the Major and the Minor.

Students are advised, during the U1 year, to consult their Major program adviser and the Academic Adviser of the Minor. At the time of registration for the U2 year, students must declare their intent to obtain the Minor. With the agreement of their Major program adviser they must submit their program of courses already taken, and to be taken, to the Academic Adviser of the Minor. The Academic Adviser of the Minor will then certify which courses the student will apply toward the Minor and confirm that the student's program conforms with its requirements.

For information on academic advising, see: www.mcgill.ca/macdonald/studentinfo/advising

General Regulations

To obtain a Minor in Ecological Agriculture, students must:

a) Ensure that their academic record at the University includes a C grade or higher in the courses as specified in the course requirements given below.

b) Offer a minimum total of 24 credits from the courses as given below, of which not more than 6 credits may be counted for both the Major and the Minor programs. This restriction does not apply to elective courses in the Major program.

Required Courses (12 credits)

  • AGEC 430 Agriculture, Food and Resource Policy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : Examination of North American and international agriculture, food and resource policies, policy instruments, programs and their implications. Economic analysis applied to the principles, procedures and objectives of various policy actions affecting agriculture, and the environment.

    Terms: Winter 2019

    Instructors: Gordon Hickey (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures

    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or equivalent

  • AGRI 215 Agro-Ecosystems Field Course (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Through case studies and field trips, students will examine the problems and constraints within the Canadian agro-ecosystem, including the interrelationships among food production, the environment, agricultural policy and social issues. Research in this field of study will also be introduced.

    Terms: Fall 2018

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg, Elsa Vasseur (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PLNT 215.

    • This course carries an additional charge of $56.14 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips to agricultural enterprises. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

  • AGRI 340 Principles of Ecological Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Focus on low-input, sustainable, and organic agriculture: the farm as an ecosystem; complex system theory; practical examples of soil management, pest control, integrated crop and livestock production, and marketing systems.

    Terms: Winter 2019

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Winter)

    • 3 lectures and one 2-hour seminar

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken AGRI 250

  • SOIL 535 Ecological Soil Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Soil Science : The physical and chemical environment of soil organisms; survey of soil microflora and fauna; processes and interactions in the soil-plant system at local and global scales; human impacts and management of soil biota; critical analysis and interpretation of primary scientific literature in soil ecology.

    Terms: Winter 2019

    Instructors: Cynthia Kallenbach (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • Prerequisite(s): ENVB 210 or GEOG 305 or SOIL 326 or permission of instructor.

    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken SOIL 335.

Complementary Courses (12 credits)

  • AGRI 310 Internship in Agriculture/Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Internship on working farms or in other appropriate businesses of the agri-food/environment industries.

    Terms: Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Summer 2019

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Fall) Caroline B Begg (Winter) Caroline B Begg (Summer)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken AGRI 201D1/D2.

  • AGRI 411 Global Issues on Development, Food and Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : International development and world food security and challenges in developing countries. Soil and water management, climate change, demographic issues, plant and animal resources conservation, bio-products and biofuels, economic and environmental issues specially in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Globalization, sustainable development, technology transfer and human resources needs for rural development.

    Terms: Winter 2019

    Instructors: Donald L Smith (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Two 2-hour conferences

  • ANSC 312 Animal Health and Disease (3 credits)

    Offered by: Animal Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Animal Science : An introduction to the pathogenesis and control of diseases in farm animals. Immune response and other protective mechanisms. Implications of animal diseases and drug therapy for product safety and public health.

    Terms: Winter 2019

    Instructors: Vilceu Bordignon (Winter)

  • BREE 327 Bio-Environmental Engineering (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : An introduction to how humans affect the earth's ecosystem and projections for the needs of food, water, air and energy to support the human population. Ecologically-reasonable coping strategies including biofuels, bioprocessing, waste management, and remediation methods.

    Terms: Fall 2018

    Instructors: Mark Lefsrud (Fall)

    • An introduction to how humans affect the earth's ecosystem and projections for the needs of food, water, air and energy to support the human population. Ecologically-reasonable coping strategies including biofuels, bioprocessing, waste management, and remediation methods.

    • Restrictions: U2 students and above. Not open to students who have taken ABEN 305.

    • This course carries an additional course charge of $10.19 to cover transportation costs for field trips which may include a solar installation site and if registrations permit, a bio-ethanol plant. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

  • ENTO 352 Biocontrol of Pest Insects (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Entomology : Modern concepts of integrated control techniques and principles of insect pest management, with emphasis on biological control (use of predators, parasites and pathogens against pest insects), population monitoring, and manipulation of environmental, behavioral and physiological factors in the pest's way of life. Physical, cultural, and genetic controls and an introduction to the use of non-toxic biochemical controls (attractants, repellents, pheromones, antimetabolites).

    Terms: Winter 2019

    Instructors: Gary Brian Dunphy (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have previously taken ENTO 452

    • 3 lectures

  • MICR 331 Microbial Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Microbiology (Agric&Envir Sc) : The ecology of microorganisms, primarily bacteria and archaea, and their roles in biogeochemical cycles will be discussed. Microbial interactions with the environment, plants, animals and other microbes emphasizing the underlying genetics and physiology. Diversity, evolution (microbial phylogenetics) and the application of molecular biology in microbial ecology.

    Terms: Winter 2019

    Instructors: Brian T Driscoll (Winter)

  • NUTR 341 Global Food Security (3 credits)

    Offered by: Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : Food insecurity is one of the most critical issues humanity has faced in history. The magnitude of this phenomenon, reflected in its worldwide presence and in the number of individuals affected, makes it an imperative component of all nations' and of all internaltional agencies' agendas. Its complexity of determinants and its numerous consequences require the involvement of multipe disciplines and sectors. McGill undergraduate students as future professionals tackling global issues require an integrated and multidisciplinary training on food security.

    Terms: Fall 2018

    Instructors: Hugo Melgar-Quiñonez (Fall)

    • Corequisite(s): NUTR 207 or permission of Instructor

  • PLNT 302 Forage Crops and Pastures (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Ecology, management, and physiology of forage crops with emphasis on establishment, growth, maintenance, harvesting, and preservation; value as livestock feed in terms of nutritional composition and role in environmental conservation.

    Terms: Fall 2018

    Instructors: Philippe Seguin (Fall)

  • PLNT 307 Agroecology of Vegetables and Fruits (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Application of ecological concepts and principles to the design and management of selected vegetable and fruit agroecosystems. Includes selection of varieties and management from seedling to harvest to storage.

    Terms: Winter 2019

    Instructors: Valérie Gravel (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: AEBI 210 or permission of the instructor

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PLNT 321.

  • PLNT 312 Urban Horticulture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Selection, use and care of plants in urban environments for the benefit of urban populations: landscape design, turf and green space management, urban trees, green roofs and walls, design and management of community gardens, urban agriculture.

    Terms: Winter 2019

    Instructors: David Wees (Winter)

  • PLNT 434 Weed Biology and Control (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : A study of the biology of undesirable vegetation as related to the principles of prevention and physical, biological, managerial and chemical control. Emphasis on the environmental impact of the different methods of weed control.

    Terms: Winter 2019

    Instructors: Alan K Watson (Winter)

  • PLNT 460 Plant Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Theory and practice of plant ecology with an emphasis on the interaction between patterns and ecological processes and the dynamics, conservation and management of plant populations and communities over a range of temporal and spatial scales.

    Terms: Fall 2018

    Instructors: Thomas Pray (Fall)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • Prerequisite: AEMA 310 or permission of instructor.

    • This course carries an additional charge of $28.07 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

  • WOOD 441 Integrated Forest Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Woodland Resources : The study of silviculture and silvics and their application to forest management to sustain the production of wood and other ecological goods and services such as wildlife, water and landscape in natural forests and rural environments (agroforestry). Acquisition of practical skills in forest surveying and computer simulation of forest growth.

    Terms: Winter 2019

    Instructors: Benoit Cote (Winter)

Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences—2018-2019 (last updated Aug. 22, 2018) (disclaimer)