More from News releases

classified as:
  • mni mcgill.ca/newsroom
  • News releases
  • External
subscribe

Do we trust people who speak with an accent?

You are in a strange neighbourhood, your cell phone’s dead, and you desperately need to find the closest garage. A couple of people on the street chime in, each sending you in opposite directions. One person sounds like a local and speaks in a nonchalant manner, while the other uses a loud, confident voice but speaks with a strong accent. Who are you going to trust?...

Published: 19 Sep 2018

New insight into aging

Plasticity is enhanced but dysregulated in the aging brain

They say you can’t teach old dogs new tricks, but new research shows you can teach an old rat new sounds, even if the lesson doesn’t stick very long.

...
Published: 19 Sep 2018

Nuclear pasta, the hardest known substance in the universe

A team of scientists has calculated the strength of the material deep inside the crust of neutron stars and found it to be the strongest known material in the universe.

Matthew Caplan, a postdoctoral research fellow at McGill University, and his colleagues from Indiana University and the California Institute of Technology, successfully ran the largest computer simulations ever conducted of neutron star crusts, becoming the first to describe how these break.

...
Published: 18 Sep 2018

New means to fight ‘un-killable’ bacteria in healthcare settings

Scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) have identified new means of fighting drug-tolerant bacteria, a growing global threat as menacing as drug-resistant microbes. Little is known about the mechanisms leading to tolerance, a strategy that makes bacteria “indifferent” to antibiotics and almost “un-killable,” which results in chronic infections extremely difficult to treat and cure.

...
Published: 13 Sep 2018

Eleven McGill scholars honoured by the Royal Society of Canada

Today, the Royal Society of Canada (RSC) announced the induction of 89 new Fellows, five of which are McGill researchers and scholars. The RSC also announced 52 new members to the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists, including six McGill scholars. The new cohorts of Fellows and Members will be formally inducted into the RSC in November, in Halifax.

...
Published: 11 Sep 2018

New cities may make millions more vulnerable to climate change

A forthcoming study of over a hundred new cities being built around the world suggests developers and planning authorities are doing very little to make their projects resilient to climate change. On the contrary, a boom in new city projects in coastal areas – including some on reclaimed land in the sea – appears to fly in the face of the danger of rising sea levels and more frequent extreme weather events.

...
Published: 10 Sep 2018

Complete make-over in fight of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

Several new medicines have been found to be more effective than traditional ones used to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), according to a new international collaborative study led by Dr. Dick Menzies, senior scientist at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in Montreal....

Published: 7 Sep 2018

Life-saving epinephrine underused during anaphylaxis outside of hospital, study finds

Fewer than half of adults and children experiencing food-induced anaphylaxis use their epinephrine autoinjector (EAI) before being treated at a hospital emergency room, according to a new Canadian study.

...
Published: 7 Sep 2018

Daring to explore with physician astronaut David Saint-Jacques

By Diane Weidner, Steinberg Centre for Simulation and Interactive Learning

...
Published: 4 Sep 2018

Preterm birth: The "Nodal" gene under the microscope

Preterm birth is a major global public health problem. Every year, 15 million babies are born prematurely and many will suffer from neurodegenerative disorders, including cerebral palsy, learning disabilities, impaired vision, and behavioural problems.

...
Published: 4 Sep 2018

Students at McGill University receive Canada’s largest Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) scholarship

Miasya Bulger and Raphael Hotter have been named McGill’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leaders Scholarship.

This year, out of a pool of 350,000 potential candidates across Canada, 1,400 students were nominated, of which 50 received this celebrated award.

...
Published: 30 Aug 2018

New genetics findings unravel key components of fracture risk in osteoporosis

The largest study ever to investigate the genetics of osteoporosis and fracture risk determined that only two examined factors – bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle strength – play a potentially causal role in the risk of suffering osteoporotic fracture, a major health problem affecting more than 9 million people worldwide very year....

Published: 30 Aug 2018

The link between obesity, the brain, and genetics

When it comes to weight gain, the problem may be mostly in our heads, and our genes

Clinicians should consider how the way we think can make us vulnerable to obesity, and how obesity is genetically intertwined with brain structure and mental performance, according to new research.

...
Published: 28 Aug 2018

How we judge personality from faces depends on our pre-existing beliefs about how personality works

PHOTO: In a series of experiments, NYU researchers tested how much we believe different traits co-occur in other people's personalities—for instance, how much we think competence co-occurs with friendliness in others. They then used a method able to visualize the subjects’ mental image of a personality trait, allowing them to see if subjects who believe competent people tend to also be friendly have mental images of a competent face and friendly face that are physically more resembling....

Published: 27 Aug 2018

Pages